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Euronese

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Euronese
Created by: Comrade Chen 
Setting and usage: Official language of the SR Boli
Total speakers:
Category (purpose): constructed language
 International auxiliary language
  Euronese 
Regulated by: Euronese Standardization Committee
Language codes
ISO 639-1: none
ISO 639-2: art
ISO 639-3:


OverviewEdit

Euronese is an official language of the micronation project SR Boli. The base grammar was invented by Comrade Chen, and was expanded upon and reformed by the Euronese Standardization Committee.

The vast majority of Euronese syntax is based off of French, with borrowings from Afrikaans, Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese and Shanghai dialects), German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian and Yiddish. The grammar is somewhat French inspired, but "maintains" features of English.


AlphabetEdit

Euronese uses the Latin script, with some additions.

Euronese IPA
A a [ɑ]
B b [b]
S‛ s‛ [ʃ]
D d [d]
E e [e~ɛ]
F f [f]
G g [g] and [dʒ]*
H h [h]
I i [i~ɪ]
J j [ʒ]
K k [k]
L l [l]
M m [m]
N n [n]
O o [o]
P p [p]
Q q [k]* and [tʃ] or [ʨ] in loanwords from Chinese
K‛ k‛ [q]
R r [r]
S s [s]
C c [s] or [k]*
T t [t]
U u [u]
V v [v]
W w [w]
X x [ʃ] or [ɕ] (appears in loanwords from Chinese)
Ý ý [j]
J‛ j‛ [z]
Ə ə [Ø]̈
H‛ h‛ [ʒ]
G‛ g‛ [ɣ]
T‛ t‛ [θ] and [ð]
Ch ch [tʃ]
Ň ň [ŋ]
Ñ ñ [ɲ]
C‛ c‛ [ts]


*

-G is pronounced as [g] (voiced velar plosive) before "a", "o" and "u", and [dʒ]̈ (voiced postalveolar affricate) before "e", "i" and "ə". To write the phonemes /ge/ and /gi/, a "u" should be added after the "g". To write the phonemes /dʒɑ/, /dʒo/ and /dʒu/, an "i" should be added after the "g". To write the phonemes /gwe/ and /gwi/, an umlaut ( ̈ ) should be added to the "u" the preceeds the "g".

-Q is pronounced as [k] when proceeded by "ue" or "ui", which would be pronounced as /ke/ and /ki/ respectively.

-C is pronounced as [s] (voiceless alveolar fricative) before "e", "i" and "ə", and as [k] (voiceless velar plosive) before "a", "o" and "u".

The following diacritic vowels appear naturally in Euronese but are not reflected in pronunciation: à, è, ê, ï, ô

The following Latin letters may be used in words from foreign languages: á, é, ĕ, ŏ, ŭ

Basic GrammarEdit

NounsEdit

Nouns come in two categories, “heavy,” and, “light”.

Heavy nouns end in “o”, “u”, “ə” or a consonant

Light nouns end in “a”, “i” or “e”.


Heavy nouns:

Euronese English
Inmin People
Deis‛ Country
Orientu East
Fuego Fire
S‛evou Hair



Light nouns:

Euronese English
Partiýa Party
Aňulia Finger
Likhne* Line
Tierra Eartha
Aýi Aunt


Plural

The plural of the noun is formed by adding “s” to the end of a noun

Euronese English
Deis‛s Country
S‛evous Hair
Partiýas Party
Aýis Aunt

Nouns ending in "on" and "s" get the special plural "-es". This does not make the nouns "light", however.

Singular Plural English
Acc‛ion Acc‛iones Actions
S‛eveus S‛eveuses Horses
Revoluc‛ion Revoluc‛iones Revolutions
Leson Lesones Lessons


The articlesEdit

The definite article

The definite article has four forms, one for each category of noun in the singular and plural.

Il

Used for singular heavy nouns

Il Inmin The People

Il orientu The east


La

Used for singular light nouns

La Partiýa The Party

La tierra The earth


Los

Used for plural heavy nouns

Los deis‛s the countries

Los s‛evous the hairs


Las

Used for plural light nouns

Las aýis the aunts

Las liñes the lines


The indefinite article

The indefinite article has two forms, one for each category of noun in the singular plural.

Uno

Used for singular heavy nouns

Uno Inmin A People

Uno s‛evou a hair


Una

Used for singular light nouns

Una Partiýa A Party

Una liñe a line


The Partitive- Article

The partitive article has three forms, one for heavy nouns, one for light nouns, and one for plural nouns.

Note: the partitive article, like in French and other romance languages, also functions as the word “of” [see section on the word “of”]


De

Used for singular heavy nouns

De tienpo some time

De arguento some money


Di

Used light singular nouns

Di nuritura some food


Des

Used for plural nouns

Des s‛evous some hairs


Other Prepositions and Prepositional PhrasesEdit

“Of”

The word “of” has four forms, one for heavy nouns ending “o” or “u”, one for light nouns, one for heavy nouns ending in a consonant and one for plural nouns. It is essentially the exact same as the partitive article.


De

Used for singular heavy nouns

De il s‛evou of the hair


Di

Used light singular nouns

Di la s‛iena of the dog


(Noun ending in a consonant)a (“-a”)

Used for heavy singular nouns ending in a consonant

Stalina Of Stalin

Noska deis‛a Of our country

Il Inmina Of the people


Des

Used for plural nouns

Des uttes larkas of those boys


“Of the” in the plural

After October 25, 2008, a mandatory reform will have gone into effect that changes the plural forms of the prepositional phrase “of the”. The new prepositional phrase will be called the “partitive-definite article”.

The reform works as follows:

For saying “of the [heavy plural noun]”, the reform will replace:

des los [heavy plural noun]” to “dos [heavy plural noun]”

And

For saying “of the [light plural noun]”, the reform will replace:

des las [heavy plural noun]” to “das [heavy plural noun]”


Example:

The heads of the dogs

Las têtas das s‛ienas


The capitals of the countries

Las capitalas dos deis‛s


To

The Euronese word for “to” is, “à”. It is primarily used as a dative phrase to show direction, but can be used in combination with the infinitive of a verb in a sentence, so as to clarify the use of the infinitive in the sentence.


Dones il maiýs à lui Give the corn to him

Eu ni sabo que [à] palar! I don’t know what to say!


After March 8, 2008, an optional reform will have gone into effect that replaces “à” before singular nouns ending in consonants, or singular nouns beginning with a vowel with “-sko”


Una toata Stalinsko A toast to Stalin

Eusko To me

Nos vel ali ton I; Kuň’onsko We will go to the Kung’on (People’s Park)


For

The Euronese word for “for” is, “par”. It is used as a dative phrase to show direction


Eu vel que-chose faii par tu I will do anything for you


After March 8, 2008, an optional reform will have gone into effect that replaces “par” before singular nouns ending in consonants with “-ae”


Servettes il Inminae Serve (for) the people

Nos trabalýons il Communismusae We work for communism


Short list of common prepositions

Euronese English
mit with
upan over (also "above)
c‛oň from
souj‛ under
en in (sometimes "at")
und and
dans on
oýs out
si if
com as (also “like” [from the French comme])
meýs but
afn at
van by
òu or


"Should"

The word "should" in Euronese is "j‛oln". It is not conjugated in any way, and is treated as a pseudo verbial-preposition.


PossessionEdit

Possession is shown by adding “ka” or “-ka” to the end of a noun.


Euka My

Stalinka Stalin’s

Etomas‛-ka the stomach’s


PronounEdit

There are nine “personal pronouns” and five “abstract pronouns”, two of which share the same meaning. There are no objective pronouns (i.e. “Eu” means both I and me)


Personal Pronouns


Singular

Euronese English
First Person eu I or me
Second Person tu you
Third Person lui he or him
Third Person ella she or her
Third Person es it


Plural

Euronese English
First Person nos we or us
Second Person vus you (also "Polite")
Third Person luis they or them (a group of men, a group of mixed gender or “heavy” nouns)
Third Person ellas they or them (a group of women, or “light” nouns)


Abstract Pronouns

Euronese English
Itte this (also “here”)
Voh/Utte you (also "Polite")
Ittes These
Uttes Those


AdjectivesEdit

Adjectives affect nouns depending on the category and number. Adjectives come after the noun they describe.


The base adjective is the adjective used for singular heavy nouns, which always ends in “-o”. For light nouns, the “-o” is switched to “-a”. Plural is formed by adding “-s”.


Il s‛ien buono The good dog

La Partiýa Granda The Great (or big) Party

Los s‛iens buonos The good dogs

Las lechas malas The bad leeches



AdverbsEdit

Adverbs are similar to adjectives, but with several exceptions due to popular speech, not because of any special grammar patterns.

In general, adverbs are more dependent on the subject of the sentence, rather than the verb. Unlike adjectives, adverbs can come before the noun they are modifying.

Most adjectives can be used as adverbs. Adverbs follow the same grammatical pattern as adjectives in forming the correct form depending on the category and number of subject of the sentence.

To form a “-ly” adverb, take the base adjective, remove the “-o” stem and “-amento”. With that, one would apply the same grammatical patterns as just mentioned.


Nos jouýeuj‛amentos celebratons tuka anniversoa!

We happily celebrate your birthday!


Eu rapithamento kouro

I run fast


There are several adjectives in common usage that do not follow the above grammatical patterns, including “sigüe” (resolutely, also "resolutamento"), and “wanchuan” (completely, also "completamento"), which are derived from Chinese.

VerbEdit

Verbs, in their infinitive, end in “ar”, “er” or “ir”. There is no difference between the three endings. There are no irregular verbs, and all verbs follow the pattern.


There are 4 basic tenses.

Present

Past

Future

Progressive


PresentEdit

Present tense is shown by removing the “stem” of the verb (“ar”, “er” or “ir”), and conjugating it according to the pronoun it is used with

Singular

Pronoun Conjugation
First Person Eu (verb)o
Second Person Tu (verb)es
Third Person Lui

Ella

Es

(verb)e


Plural

Pronoun Conjugation
First Person Nos (verb)ons
Second Person Vus (verb)ettes
Third Person Luis

Ellas

(verb)evants


Abstract Pronouns

Pronoun Conjugation
Itte (verb)e
Voh/Utte (verb)e
Ittes (verb)evants
Uttes (verb)evants

PastEdit

The past tense has two forms; simple and perfect.

In simple, the stem is removed and “u” is added at the end


Trabalýar To work

Eu trabalýu I worked


In perfect, the word “aph” is placed before the verb, and then the simple past tense is used

Aber To have

Eu ab abu una s‛iena I have had a dog


In the past tense, the only irregularity is that the verb “ser” (to be), maintains the “e” “Seu„ was-not “su”


FutureEdit

Future tense, as well, has two forms; correct and informal


In correct, the word “vel” (will) is put before the verb, the stem is removed and replaced with “i” and the word “ton” is put after the verb.


Aler To go

Eu vel ali ton àl Kuňsa I will go to the (People’s) Commune


In the informal, the only difference is that the word “ton” is omitted, other wise it is completely the same as the correct form.


In the future tense, the only irregularity is that the verb “ser” (to be), maintains the “e”

“Vel sei ton„ will be-not “vel si ton”


ProgressiveEdit

The progressive tense functions the same as in English, showing a continuative action. It can be combined with other tenses to form the progressive forms of those tenses.

The progressive is formed by removing the stem and replacing it with “omum”


Progressive:

Apreý utilisomum la banýa, ni ferguesettes à lavar vuska meýns

After using the bathroom, don’t forget to wash your hands


Present Progressive

Eu so es‛cribomum I am writing


Past Progressive

Eu seu liromum I was reading


Future Progressive

Eu sei alomum I will be going

Word ListsEdit

Example verbsEdit

Ser/Se-er-Be

Aber-Have

Vienir-Come

Alar-Go

Aseýar-Sit

Lever-Stand/Arise/Lift

Palar-Speak

Direr-Say

Mangiar-Eat

Boir-Drink

Ecouter-Listen/Hear

Regardir-Look/See

Ver-See

Lirer-Read

Es‛criber-Write

Jouer-Play

Courir-Run

Sauter-Jump

Hiver-Throw

Couper-Cut

Tombler-Fall

Pleuir-Cry (also, To Rain)

Hasser-Laugh

Saber-Know

Pensar-Think

Volar-Want

As‛etar-Buy

Vendir-Sell

Faiar-Make, Do (faire)

Comprender-Understand (also, “Fars‛teýtar”)

Ýerchar-Support

Aimar-Love

Pasandar-Like

Busehinar-Dislike

Detester-Hate

Prender-Take

Tous‛er-Touch

Fermer-Close

Ouvrer-Open

Fergueser-Forget

Rapeler-Remember

Doner-Give

Mars‛er-Walk

Lavar-Clean, Wash

Faňer-Put

Utiliser-Use

Dormir-Sleep

Trabalýar -Work (also, “Arbetar”)

Jiver-Exist (also, To live)

Etudier-Learn (also, To study)

Reperar-Repair

Apelar-Call (also, To be called)

Suiver-Follow

Developper-Develop

Reconnaisser-Recognize

Condamner-Condemn

Promoter-Promote

Advancer-Advance

Critiquer-Criticize

Tatoer-Overthrow

Promouvouer-Improve

Fersuier-Crush

Utiliser-Use

Muert-mah‛er-Kill

Tattaquer-Attack

S‛anter-Sing

Reprej‛anter-Represent

Rou-wer-Mourn

Besoiner-Need

Efraýer-Fear

Celebrater-Celebrate

Constrocter-Construct

Mah‛er-Build



DirectionsEdit

Orientu/Doň-Faň-East

Weət-West

Nordu-North

Sud-South

Droit-Right

Sinistr-Left



Natural objectsEdit

Fuego-Fire

Tierra-Earth

Velt-World

Taifun-Storm

Əer-Air

Vent-Wind

Soel-Sun

Luen-Moon

Ciel-Sky

Ociennə-Ocean



Days of the WeekEdit

Somtag-Sunday

Montag-Monday

Tvistag-Tuesday

Vodnestag-Wednesday

Tirstag-Thursday

Freýtag-Friday

Caturtag-Saturday

S‛abbos-Sabbath (Shabbos)



MonthsEdit

(Moýn 4en) Janvari-January

(Moýn 5en) Farvari-February

(Moýn 6en) Marto-March

(Moýn 7en) Avril-April

(Moýn 8en) Mai-May

(Moýn 9en) Juin-June

(Moýn 10en) Julý-July

(Moýn 11en) Aouə-August

(Moýn 12en) Settembre-September

(Moýn 1o) Actuber-October

(Moýn 2en) Navanbre-November

(Moýn 3en) Decchembre-December



TimeEdit

Tienpo-Time

Giur-Day (Also, “tag/tog”)

Voh‛-Week

Moýn-Month

Ýor-Year

Nuito-Night

Morguen-Morning

Midtog-Noon

Apreýmidtog-Afternoon

Ýechien-Evening

Segiur-Today

Deman-Tomorrow

Əiieý-Yesterday

Ec‛t-Now

S‛ac(time)-Every(time)

Hoeur-Hour

Minuto-Minute

Seconda-Second

Decad-Decade

Centuria-Century


Parts of the BodyEdit

Cors-Body

Têta-Head

Vij‛aj-Face

Ýeu-Eye

Oreý-Ear

Bec-Nose

Bous‛-Mouth

Bodj‛-Neck

Chêc-Cheek

Goja-Throat

Nena-Breast

Coug‛o-Heart

Meýn-Hand

Aňut-Thumb

Aňulia-Finger

G‛eta-Wrist

Etomas‛-Stomach

Revers-Back

Pied-Foot (Also “leg”)

Əumý-Bone

S‛evou-Hair

S‛weý-Blood

Carne-Flesh



FamilyEdit

Familiu-Family

Muter-Mother

Pater-Father

Baba-second Father

Fi-Child

Fio-Son

Fiýa-Daughter

Bhaiýa-Brother

Bheýn-Sister

Əuomm-Man

Mads‛ena-Woman

Epusa-Wife

Epuso-Husband

Chachu-Uncle

Aýi-Aunt

Grand(family)-Grand(family)



PlacesEdit

Deýfoňa-Place

Erec‛-Land

Deis‛-Country

Staat-the State

Provencia-Province

Nac‛ion-Nation

Fuerta-Fort

Forêt-Forest

Rivero-River

Lac-Lake

Cidade-City

Vilaj-Village

Etat-State

Ro-Street

Meýson-House

Chambre-Room

Banýa-Bathroom

G‛ardenýa-Garden

Cwisin-Kitchen

Kuň’on-Park

Kuňsa-Commune



NumbersEdit

Uno-One

Due-Two

Dri-Three

Quatru-Four

Chinqüe-Five

Sekstu-Six

Septu-Seven

Ottu-Eight

Nonu-Nine

Dies-Ten


To form the numbers 11-19, add “-j‛e” to the numbers 1-9

To form the “10” numbers (20, 30 etc), add “-ta” to the number 2-9


Cent-Hundred

Miý-Thousand

Milýone-Million

Bilýone-Billion

Demi-Half

Quəart-Quarter

Lah‛-Hudred Thousand

Parskror-Five hundred Thousand

Cror-Ten million


(1o) Primiero-First

to form the rest of the ordinal numbers add “-en/(number)en” to the end of the number

GrainsEdit

Bleý-Wheat

Rij‛-Rice

Maiýs-Corn

Milleý-Millet

S‛pelt-Spelt

C‛ampa-Barley

Farina-Flour

Flaksa-Flax

Soýa-Soy

Rýh‛-Rye

Oat-Oats


Indian Style FoodsEdit

Dahi-Yogurt

Ghi-Clarified Butter

Daal-Lentils

Chaana-Chickpeas


Chinese Style FoodsEdit

Duvu-Tofu

Fogo-Hotpot (also called “dabinlo”)

Dimsuma-Dim sum (dianxin)

Giaudj‛i-Dumpling

Nomaigai-Sticky Rice

Tousa-Red been paste


VegetablesEdit

Veguetable-Vegetable

Cabag‛a-Cabbage

Bhindi-Okra

Wanýion-Onion

Pois-Beans

Cartofle-Potato

Tamat-Tomato

Radis-Radish

Brocolia-Broccoli

Carrota-Carrot


FruitsEdit

Frui-Fruit

Banan-Banana

Maňu-Mango

Reýsan-Grape

Limona-Lemon

Limon-Lime

Pomm-Apple

Pes‛-Peach

Naraňh‛a-Orange

Mikan-Clementine

Ananas-Pineapple


MeatsEdit

Carne-Meat

Pouleý-Chicken

Boeuf-Beef

Pes‛(a)-Fish


Forbidden MeatsEdit

Treýf-Foods forbidden by Jewish law

Puerca-Pork

Haisin-seafood

Prounas-Shrimp

Prounas Dragonas-Lobster

Kani-Crab

Pes‛a Gata-Catfish



AnimalsEdit

Animalia-Animal

Elefante-Elephant

Tigre-tiger

Lion-Lion

Urs-Bear

Dos‛i-Deer

Vas‛-Cow

S‛iena-Dog

Gato-Cat

Viand-Goat

Mutan-Lamb

S‛eveus-Horse



ColorsEdit

Colore-Color

Negro-Black

Rogio-Red

Roso-Pink

Jauno-Yellow

Verto-Green

Blouo-Blue

Griso-Grey

Brunetto-Brown



OccupationEdit

Occupac‛ion-Occupation

Arbeter-Worker

Fermier-Farmer/Peasant

Rodoňgia-Labourer

Eleve-Student

Lumgia-Weaver

Levergia-Washerman

S‛evoucoupergia-Barber

Roreperargia-Cobbler

Metalurggia-Goldsmith

Veldgia-Welder

Lwagia-Lawyer

Mitteariagia-Confectioner

Souk‛-wallah-Store Owner

Taek‛si-wallah-Taxi Driver

Rýoňdogia-Leader (also Gidogia)

Daňýuan-Party Official



EducationEdit

Educac‛ion-Education

Es‛cola-School

Classa-Class

Profesor-Teacher

Vaýsh‛ait-Knowledge

Liver-Book

Leson-Lesson

K‛estion-Question

Ansior-Answer

Egj‛aminac‛ion-Examination

Testo-Test

Metoda-Method

Sklarismus-Sklarism (Revolutionary Educational Method)

Arta-Art

Skila-Skill

Vort-Word

S‛týlo-Pen

Pencil-Pencil (also, “Craýon”)

Mis‛el-Proverb (pl. Mis‛lei)

Əistwar-Story

Əistorio-History

Geografia-Geography

Mat‛ematicas-Math

Squiencəa-Science

Lýsenkoismus-Lysekoist Biology

Alquemia-Chemistry (also “Chimia”)

Gueomitria-Geometry

Liňuas Forenýas-Foreign Language



IndustryEdit

Industria-Industry

Factoria-Factory

Industria Lih‛ta-Light Industry

Crafta-Craft

Arbet-Work (also, “Trabalý”)

Rodoň-Labour

Týe-Iron

Gaň-Steel

Furnesa-Furnace

Daqiň-Daqing (a model Industrial Commune)

Prodoccion-Production

Goel Prodocciona-Production Goal

Plan-Plan



AgricultureEdit

Agricoltura-Agriculture

Tenel-Field

Dajai-Dazhai (a model Agricultural Commune)

Gren-Seed

Cropa-Crop

Swal-Soil

Acre-Plot of land



FeelingsEdit

Imocion-Emotion

Jouýeuj‛o-Happy

S‛oudlero-Warm

Tristo-Sad

Froido-Cold

Aima-Love

Detesta-Hate

Coňfuj‛ero-Confused

Coug‛euj‛o-Courage



AdjectivesEdit

Adgettivos-Adjectives

Buono-Good

Malo-Bad

Grando-Big (also, Great)

Petito-Small (also, Short)

Novo-New

Ajeýo-Old

Mitteo-Sweet

Du-sel-Salty (use as is, do not conjugate in normal adjectival pattern)

Tarto-Sour

Pimento-Spicy

Mararo-Bitter

Minso-Thin

Gordo-Fat

Igüio-Expensive

Bo’o-Beautiful

Cho’o-Ugly

Gioleýo-Lovely

Loňo-Long

Lourdo-Heavy

Lejero-Light (not heavy)

Radianto-Radiant

Glorioso-Glorious

Mag‛nifico-Magnificent

Vraimento-Truly

Falso-False

Darko-Dark

Contento-Content



Illness and Unfavorable ElementsEdit

Sante-Health

Medecino-Medicine

Doctore-Doctor

Ôpital-Hospital

Malad-Illness

Malado-Sick

Fefer-Fever

Colda-Cold

Neumonia-Pneumonia

Flu-Flu

Cancer-Cancer

Toň-Pain

Tataca il Coug‛a-Heart Attack

Poks-Chicken Pox

S.A.D.I.-AIDS

V.Əu.D.I.-HIV

Aveulgio-Blind

Sourdo-Deaf

Vomit-Vomit

Intoksicado-Intoxicated

Devianto Soc‛ialo -Social Deviant



The PartyEdit

Partiýa-Party

Communisto-Communist

Revoluc‛ionario-Revolutionary

Revoluc‛ion-Revolution

Soc‛ialisto-Socialist

Soc‛ialismus-Socialism

Marksismus-Marxism

Leninismus-Leninism

Pensiamo-Thought

Inmin-People

Armiýa-Army

Taiýunsei-General

Liñe-Line (pronounced linýe)

Elementa-Element

Deviasionismus-Deviantionism

Revijionismus-Revisionism

Reaccionario-Reactionary

G‛itan-Clique (also “gang”)

Teoria-Theory

Jus‛i-Chairman

Committia Centrala-Central Committee

Propaganda-Propaganda

Guenosse-Comrade (plu. Guenossen)

Tovaris‛ch-Comrade (pron. Tavaris‛) (plu. Tovaris‛chi)

Drapo-Banner (also Flag)

Reprej‛entivo-Representative

Siýa-Cause

Maitog-May Day

Fan-Anti



InterrogativesEdit

Qui-Who

Que-What

Kitte-Where

Qüand-When

Pareque-Why

Commont-How

Kitne-How Much

Quel-Which



Useful WordsEdit

Aalo-Hello

Daj‛va-Goodbye

Spas-Please

Danka-Thank you

Nonevento-You’re welcome

Iras‛hai-Welcome

Da-Yes

Ni-No

Xinkula?-“How are you” (common greeting meaning “You have worked hard?”)

Wei Renmin Fuwu-“Fine.” (response to above meaning “Serving the people.”)

Ossi-Also, too

T‛o-So

Beseder-OK

Toto-All

Und-And

Kuch-Only

Oncor-Again

Pir-Then

Bes‛u-Must

…Manse-Long Live…

Sigüe-Completely


GreetingsEdit

Welcome - Iras‛hai

Hello - Aalo

Good morning - Buonogiur

Good afternoon - Buono Apreýmid-tog

Good evening - Buono Aven

Good night - Buono Nuito

Good bye - Daj‛va

How are you? - Commont ses tu?

Long time no see - Ohisas‛iburidesne

What's your name? - Vuska nome se commont apelèa?

Where are you from? - C‛oň kitte vienettes vus?

Pleased to meet you - Es se bocup buono à faiar vuska acwancenta

Good luck - Buono chancə! (Jufuni!)

Cheers/Good health - Gambui!/Sante! (Nostrovýa!)

Bon appétit - Ittadakimasə

Bon voyage - Buono voýajə

Excuse me/ Sorry - Teveixiba!

How much is this? - Itte se kitne paise?

Thank you - Danka

You're welcome - Non evento

Where's the toilet? - Kitte se la banýa?

I love you - Tə-aimo

Example textEdit

Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

"Totos əumanos sevants naissevants libero und ecwalo en dinýiteè und reh‛ts. Sevants douevants mit raison unth conciencə und j‛oln ajevants ò́s outros en uno espiriə bhaiýas‛iffa."

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brothejood.



Cyrillic Alphabet for EuroneseEdit

An adaptation of the Cyrillic Alphabet is also used to write Euronese.

Cyrillic "Layout"Edit

Cyrillic Euronese Latin Euronese
А а A
Б б B b
Ш ш S‛ s‛
Д д D d
Э э* E e
Е е* E e
Ф ф F f
Г г G g
Ј ј H h
Һ* H h
И и* I i
İ і* I i
I ı* I i
Ҷ ҷ Gi gi
К к K k
Л л L l
М м M m
Н н N n
О о O o
П п P p
Қ қ K‛ k‛
Р р R r
С с S s
Т т T t
У у U u
В в V v
Ў ў W w
Й й Ý ý
Ы ы* Ý ý
Х х H‛ h‛
З з J‛ j‛
Ж ж J j
Ғ ғ G‛ g‛
Ҭ ҭ T‛ t‛
Ч ч Ch ch
Ц ц C‛ c‛
Я я Ýa ýa
Ю ю Ýu ýu
Ё ё Ýо ýо
ӊ ň
ѯ ks
  • Notes

There are two variations of the letter “e” in Cyrillic. The letter “э” is used in the initial and final position and “е” is used in the medial position. When “е” is used in the initial position, it is pronounced as “ýe”.

The letter “Һ” is used specifically after consonants, as in the word “бҺаія” (“bhaiýa”, brother).

There are three variations of the letter “i” in Cyrillic. The letter “и” is used in the initial and final position. The letter “і” (dotted I) is used next to other vowels or the letter “й”. The letter “ı” (dottless I) is used between consonants.

The letter “ы” is a variation of the letter “ý” in Cyrillic that is used specifically in the final position.

Sample text using CyrillicEdit

Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

«Тотос 'уманос сeвантс наiссeвантс лıберо унд экуало эн дıнйітеэ унд рехтс. Севантс доуевантс мıт раісон унд консіенс' унд золн ажевантс ос оутрос эн уно эспири' бҺаіяшıффа.»

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

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