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Henton Saxon

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Henton Saxon
Type Fusional
Alignment Nom./Secund.
Head direction Initial
Tonal No
Declensions Yes
Conjugations Yes
Genders N/A
Nouns decline according to...
Case Number
Definiteness Gender
Verbs conjugate according to...
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect
Meta-information
Progress 0%
Statistics
Nouns 0%
Verbs 0%
Adjectives 0%
Syntax 0%
Words of 1500
Creator Elector Dark

General InfoEdit

Though the language itself is in general referred to plainly as Sächsisch — natively rendered as Saxisch — the term Henton Saxon refers specifically to the language codified by the Henton & Ȝearliȝe Wordbook (henceforth abbreviated as H&Ȝ), pressed by the Wessiȝ Prefecture and the Burgraveship of Fromenmoot. The grammatical norms and words defined in the H&Ȝ somewhat accurately reflect the semi-standardised variety of a Saxon language spoken in eastern Cornwall, in Wessiȝ, Suthiȝ and Kent, though much dialectical standardisation and levelling is shown in the H&Ȝ forms.

The proscribed name for this form of the language is formally Henton-and-Ȝearliȝe Saxon — even as the majority of speakers use "Saxisch" as their term of choice.

PhonologyEdit

The phonology of the Wessiȝ dialect of Henton Saxon is fairly representative of the language area as a whole. It reflects several very distinct southern English features, though it is generally free of the more extensive German influence exerted on more eastern dialects. It has 26 consonant phonemes and 13 vowels.

The twenty-six consonant phonemes, along with their most common orthographical representations, are:

Bilabial Dental Alveolar Palatal Velar
Nasals m (m) n (n) ŋ (nk/ng/nch)
Stops p b (p b) t d (t d) tʃ dʒ (tch/ch dg/j) k g (k g)
ts (ts/z)
Fricatives f v (f v/f) θ ð (th þ/th) s z (s z) ʃ ʒ (sch j) x ɣ ɣʷ (ch h hw)
Sonorants w (w/ȝ) r l (r l) j (ȝ)

The 13 vowels, in the vowel space:

Front Central Back
High i: ɪ aɨ aʉ u: ʌ
Mid ɛ əɨ əʉ
ə
ɔ
Low a: a

Stress, Phonotactics, Phoneme DistributionEdit

As is the general case among Germanic languages, Wessiȝ Saxon allows both words that are monosyllabic and polysyllabic. Not deviating from the common Germanic norm, it allows various sorts of consonant clusters and tends to avoid vowel hiatuses. Vowels are the only permissible syllable nucleus — epenthetic vowels may be inserted to break up clusters that do not conform to phonaesthetics, and often undergo syncope when a syllabic suffix is added.

Stress in words is generally fixed. Native words are always stressed on the first syllable of the root: the stress doesn't retract to the first syllable of a word when a prefix is added. Foreign loans, especially those that are recent or otherwise poorly integrated into the phonetics and lexicon of the language, may have stress on syllables other than the root initial: e.g. Latinate words tend to retain the stress they had in Latin. Saxon stress is a combination of pitch, loudness, and vowel quality: length is phonemic, and short vowels are quantitatively the same regardless of the stress.

A peculiarity of Saxon is that it generally disallows word-initial voiceless fricatives — the only exceptions are the clusters /sp st sk/ that have a voiceless sibilant, certain loans such as <France> /fra:ns/, and words influenced by loans, such as <frank> /frank/.

OrthographyEdit

As with most English languages with a literate tradition, Henton Saxon has an orthography that is sprinkled with irregularities and odd patterns, stemming from its long history of development. It continues several prominent Old and Middle English scribal traditions and peculiarities, such as the retention of the ȝeoch and þorn.

Tradition divides the graphemes of the H&Ȝ standard into two groups: the vowel graphemes <a e ȝ i o u y> and the consonant graphemes <b c d f g ȝ h j k l m n p q r s þ t v w x z>. The ȝeoch <ȝ> is counted as both a consonant and a vowel due to its erratic representation and usage.

The consonantal grapheme set <p b t d k g> represents the plosives /p b t d k g/.

The fricative grapheme pair <v h> maps to /v ɣ/, whereas the remaining pair <f s> can map to both the voiceless /f s/ and their voiced counterparts /v z/; while <f> is /v/ only initially, <s> may be /z/ intervocalically, as well as word-finally in unstressed monosyllables.
The grapheme <z> represents /z/ in native words, and the affricate /ts/ in loans from languages such as German and Italian.
The grapheme <þ> represents /ð/, and occurs only initially. Word-internally, the digraph <th> is used to represent /θ ð/.
The digraphs <ch hw> represent /x ɣʷ/, and the trigraph <sch> represents /ʃ/. A few loans from French and Spanish have <j> representing the voiced /ʒ/.

The affricate /tʃ/ is represented by <ch> word-initially — as native words do not have /x/ in initial positions — and <tch> internally. Its voiced counterpart /dʒ/ is represented by <dg> in native words, where it is never initial, and by <j> in loans from Norman.

The grapheme <m> represents /m/ in all cases, whereas <n> represents a coronal /n/ only when not near velars; <n> followed by any of <k g ch> always represents /ŋ/, though the sequence <ng> is ambiguous as to whether it represents the cluster /ŋg/ or just the nasal /ŋ/.

The trio <w r l> represents /w r l/ in all positions. The function and distribution of the ȝeoch <ȝ> is best covered as a part of the framework of vowel graphemes.

Digraphs are resolved first in non-compounds; compounds that generate such sequences may optionally be written with a hyphen.

NounsEdit

VerbsEdit

SyntaxEdit

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