Fandom

Conlang

Illiaster

3,198articles on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk1 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.


Progress 75%
Illiaster
ɪllɪæstɛŕ
Type
Alignment
Head direction
Tonal
No
Declensions
Yes
Conjugations
Yes
Genders
No
Nouns decline according to...
Case Number
Definiteness Gender
Verbs conjugate according to...
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect



General informationEdit

Illiaster is the primary language of Illias.

PhonologyEdit

ConsonantsEdit

Bilabial Labio-dental Dental Alveolar Palatal Velar Glottal
Plosive p t k g
Fricative β v th (θ) s ç ʝ h
Approximant r
Trill ŕ
Lateral app. l

VowelsEdit

Front Near-front Central Near-back Back
Close ʉ
Near-close ɪ ʊ
Mid o
Open-mid ɛ
Near-open æ
Open ä

AlphabetEdit

Illiaster has three written forms, circular, runic, and calligraphic.
Sample

"Illiaster" in the calligraphic, runic, and circular writing systems.

The circular system is written as a series of concentric rings, with the first letter at the center. Each letter is distinguished by a mark placed on the circle at one of seven points. The form was originally used for names, such as grave markers, so there is no established direction or punctuation. Double consonants are usually dropped. Examples exist in which consonants in a cluster are written on the same circle (see ring 5 in the sample).

The runic system is written top to bottom about a central vertical line. Each letter is represented by a combination of eight diagonal, horizonal, or circular marks. Like the circular system, most old samples of runic Illiaster are found on grave markers and do not have punctuation. A full horizontal bar represents a space between words. For extended runic writing, an open circle bisected by the vertical is the generally accepted mark to separate multiple sentences.

The calligraphic system is written right to left. The consonants have distinct capital and lowercase forms, while vowels are indicated using diacritical marks. Most letters connect to form cursive, though several lowercase letters begin at the cap line and do not connect to the preceeding letter (including L and T in the sample).

The Illiaster alphabet is ordered as follows: Pp Ʊʊ Bβ Vv Ɛɛ Θθ Tt Ss Ææ Kk Gg Oo Rr Ŕŕ ʆʝ Iɪ Hh Ʉʉ Ll Çç Ää

PhonotacticsEdit

All verb roots end with a consonant.

Double consonants are rare, but do exist.

The letter combinations "sh" and "th" do not combine into digraphs.

GrammarEdit

Gender Cases Numbers Tenses Persons Moods Voices Aspects
Verb No No No Yes No Yes No Yes
Nouns No Yes Yes No No No No No
Adjectives No No No No No No No No
Numbers No No No No No No No No
Participles No No No No No No No No
Adverb No No No No No No No No
Pronouns No Yes Yes No Yes No No No
Adpositions No No No No No No No No
Article No No No No No No No No
Particle No No No No No No No No


Word order is flexible, as the object and subject are defined by the noun declension suffix, but OSV is most common. Adjectives and adverbs preceed the words the describe.

Noun declension

Case Suffix
nominative -ʉt
accusative -ʉr
dative -or
ablative -æt
genitive -ɪβ
vocative -ʉβ
locative -ær
instrumental -oβ

Plural: add -l to end of suffix

In proper names, when the full name is used only the personal name declines. When another part of the name is used alone, it declines.


Verb conjugation

Tense Suffix
remote past θ
recent past -äv
immediate past ç
present -ɛt
immediate future ŕ
near future -og
remote future ŕ
Mood Add
indicative  ---
subjunctive θo
conditional læg
optative pʊŕ
imperative ŕoθ
jussive ɪl
potential βot
interrogative        sɪh

NamesEdit

An individual's full name is composed of the personal and parental names, followed by any descriptive names and titles.

Personal NamesEdit

Personal names are composed from two parts, combined without punctuation. The first part is gender-specific, except for some beginning with Θ and T. The options for the second part are the same for male and female names.

Male names, first part: Pɛŕθ-,lθ-, Pælv-, Pohr-, Pɪŕl-, Pʉlt-, Bæʝl-, Borθ-, Bort-, Bɪlg-, Bäθk-, Væsʝ-, Voht-, Θɛkl-, Θɛlt-, Θæks-, Θærs-, Θʉrv-, Θätl-, Θälβ-, Tʊgl-, Tɛvk-, Tɛgl-, Tægs-, Tɪsl-, Torg-, Täpt-, Tävs-, Tähg-, Sʊlh-, Sʊrt-, Kʉvh-, Kʉlp-, Gʊvl-, Gʊlç-, Gɛβt-, Gorθ-, ŕt-, Gäls-, ʆɪlβ-, ʆäθk-, Hʊlt-, Hɪβs-, Hʉŕs-, Hävl-

Female names, first part: Bɛlv-, Bɛtk-, Bolŕ-, Birv-, Bʉŕs- Θɛkl-, Θɛlt-, Θærs-, Θʉrv-, Θätl-, Tʊgl-, Tɛvk-, Tɛgl-, Tægs-, Tɪsl-, Torg-, Täpt-, Sɛsk-, Sælv-, Sæhr-, Sɪlv-, Säŕp-, Kært-, Kolθ-, ŕt-, Kälh-, Ŕʊvg-, Ŕɛhs-, Ŕoçt-, ʆæpl-, ʆɪŕt-, ʆɪŕs-, Lʊŕt-, Läθl-, Lähr-, Häβr-, Hälp-, Çolt-, Çævs-, Çɪŕθ-, Çɪlk-

All names, second part: -ʊgs, -ʊgl, -ʊrθ, -ʊrt, -ɛsv, -ɛgŕ, -ɛŕg, -ɛhl, -ɛlk, -æsg, -ærs, -ælg, -oβk, -oθl, -otr, -ɪtŕ, -ɪsg, -ɪŕl, -ɪlç, -ʉst, -ʉrβ, -ʉlʝ, -äθl, -ätç, -ägt, -äht, -äçs

Personal names are pronounced by placing the last consonant of the first part into the second syllable, which is stressed: Kær-täht, Pɪŕ-lɛsv, Läh-rɛlk, Θær-sɪlç

The short form or nickname is usually created by combining the first two and last two letters of the personal name, but some people prefer a nickname formed by dropping other letters from the personal name, or combining parts of the personal and parental names.

Family NamesEdit

The second name comes from the parent of the opposite gender. Children of uncertain parentage may all use their mother's personal name, or be called Ksävɛgt / Ksävævθ (son/daughter of the wind).

Male parental name: Mother's personal name + ɛgt

Female parental name: Father's personal name + ævθ

Some individuals choose to take their spouse or sibling's name in addition to their parent's. This is usually only done when the other individual is notable. Occasionally, if there was a major break from the family, a person may give up the parental name completely.

Male family name: Wife's personal name + ʝʉg  /  Sibling's personal name + tsæk

Female family name: Husband's personal name + θɪɛl  /  Sibling's persona name + poβr

Descriptive NamesEdit

Nearly anything can be used as a descriptive name, but the most common describe an attribute, habit or profession. An individual may have multiple descriptive names over their lifetime, but rarely more than one at a time. Descriptive names are usually used by everyone except the subject.

Old Çɪsk
Young Ɛpŕʊ
New [in town] Sæg
Red (red haired) Poɪθ
Black (black haired) θ
Bright (blonde, pale skinned) ʆɪv
Dark (dark skinned) Ŕɛst
Left (left handed) Opsɛk
Hungry Hʊɛl
Thick (fat) ʆoɛŕ
Big (tall) Gæsk
Short Stɪvk
Good ʆoç
Wise Bævl
Dumb Ɛpŕʉ
Drunk Kævɪv
Counter (banker, lender) Stŕoβɪv
Tailor Vcorɪv
Hunter Brærɪv
Liar ŕθɪv

TitlesEdit

There are both hereditary/landed and appointed court positions in Illias that carry titles. These titles are placed after the full name, or before the short name. Only family and close friends are permitted to drop the title, and even then only in informal settings. Hereditary titles normally pass from both parents to the oldest child. Next-in-line heirs can be designated with ordinal numbers following the title (the third Duke would be the Duke's oldest grandchild or second oldest child).

Rank Title
Emperor/Empress Gʊlvɪç
King/Queen Äçŕɪl
Prince/Princess Θɪvloh
Duke/Duchess Pʝæt
Count/Countess βlɛθ
Baron/Baroness Tælkʊp
Responsibility Title
Academic (think) Ɛβɪv
Administrative (do) Æθɪv
Artistic (make) Bæskɪv    
Diplomatic (see) Blɪsɪv
Financial (money) Lävrɪv
Military (fight) Ŕäβɪv
Law enforcement (bark) Khʉɪv
Legal (know) Hʉɪɪv
Judicial (speak) Ærɪtɪv
Religious (sing) Ɛlvɪv

Sample LineageEdit

Lineage
The descendants of Gorθærs ʆɪŕsælgɛgt Sæg, to the current heiress to the Duchy of Hægɛl, Tɛvkäht.

The descendants of Gorθærs ʆɪŕsælgɛgt Sæg married into the landed nobility in the fifth generation, when Bæʝlærs Kälhɛlkɛgt Ŕäβɪv married Ŕɛhsɛhl Pælvʊrtævθ Pʝæt Hægɛl.

In the seventh generation, as the firstborn child Tɛvkäht inherits the title over her brother Tɛvkäθl. As infants the twins received descriptive names "the Elder" and "the Younger". Their short-form names are Tɛht Çɪsk and Tɛθl Ɛpŕʊ.

Numbers and DatesEdit

NumbersEdit

Illiaster uses a base 9 number system. The number names are compound: 0 = gäŕθ, zero; 5 = glʉs, five; 10 = vʉʊrt, one 9 and one; 27 = kɛʊvʉ or lɪtgäŕθ, two 9s and nine or three 9s and zero; 55 = khæʊrt, six 9s and one; 500 = tʉpvotglʉs, six 81s and one 9 and five; 1,000 = θɛkŕæglɪtʊrt, one 729 and three 81s and three 9s and one; 50,000 = ʝʊ θçævsotkɛglʉs ;  seven 6561s and five 729s and five 81s and two 9s and five. 

1 ʊrt one 9 vʉ- one 81 θɪr- one 729 θɛk- one 6561 ŕɪg-
2 äʝ two 9s kɛ- two 81s ʝäl- two 729s vot- two 6561s soβ-
3 θät three 9s lɪt- three 81s ŕæg- three 729s θ- three 6561s pʉl-
4 çrɪä four 9s pæ- four 81s βʊs- four 729s toβ- four 6561s äts-
5 glʉs five 9s vɛl- five 81s sot- five 729s gɪŕ- five 6561s hʉk-
6 ʝært six 9s khæ- six 81s tʉp- six 729s ʝɛt- six 6561s sɛk-
7 lɛç seven 9s go- seven 81s kɪβ- seven 729s çæv- seven 6561s ʝʊθ-
8 klɪv eight 9s ʝop- eight 81s çæs- eight 729s hʊr- eight 6561s kɪt-
9 ʊvʉ nine 9s θɪr- nine 81s θɛk- nine 729s ŕɪg- nine 6561s çɪv-

Ordinal numbers are formed by adding -ɪg to the end of the number word.

CalendarEdit

Nine months (stäŕɪç), each with eight five-day weeks, make up the standard Illiaster year (θ). The new year's festival at the end of the ninth month lasts five or six days, as determined necessary to reach the summer solstice that marks the beginning of Ætŕɪl and the new year.

Months Name Aprox. Gregorian Start Date
1 Ætŕɪl June 20
2 Goθl July 30
3 Çʉgkɛ September 8
4 Pʊst October 18
5 Lævçät November 27
6 Læβʊr January 6
7 Hɪost February 15
8 Ŕæklos March 27
9 Θoŕh May 6
Festival Krolβɛt June 15

The first day (rɪɛl) of the week (loʊp) is traditionally the day of rest. The afternoon and evening of the fourth day is traditionally reserved for religious observation.

Days Name
1 Okærɪɛl
2 θrɪɛl
3 Pɪsrɪɛl
4 Kʊɪtçrɪɛl
5 Voʝrɪɛl

Thus, the 39th of Çʉgkɛ can be written: poŕ pæθätɪg rɪɛlʉt Çʉgkɛɪβ, or more commonly just: Voʝrɪɛl, pæ'θätɪg Çʉgkɛ.

VocabularyEdit


No. English Illiaster
1Iβɛ
2you (singular)ŕä
3heʝɛ
4wehʉl
5you (plural)
6theygor
7thisgɛäl
8thathrɛθ
9herelɪä
10thereçɪks
11whoʝhɛt
12whatθʊ
13wheresokh
14whenŕɪβ
15howθɪrɛ
16notgäŕt
17allsɪŕ
18manyhɛsk
19somesplʊ
20fewvɛpt
21othervŕʊɪ
22oneʊrt
23twoäʝ
24threeθät
25fourçrɪa
26fiveglʉs
27bigθaŕg
28longtŕoʉp
29wideɛçht
30thickʝoɛŕ
31heavyvɪsk
32smallklɪp
33shortstɪvk
34narrowplæθ
35thinθɪv
36womanθʊp
37man (adult male)ghɪl
38man (human being)ɪvɪŕ
39childkæt
40wifeθɪɛl
41husbandʝʉg
42motherklʉs
43fatheräst
44animalɛŕätæ
45fishɛɪrk
46birdɪβʉ
47dogʝɛls
48louseäʊsk
49snakehɪvh
50wormʉhɪs
51treeçæŕ
52forestæθk
53stickʊvʉɪθ
54fruitçrʊ
55seedkäʝk
56leafläβ
57rootäθp
58barkkhʉ
59flowerkŕɛpɪt
60grasslhɪs
61ropekɛŕl
62skintrʊç
63meatträvk
64bloodsæp
65bonehʊpä
66fatʝhɪ
67eggɪɛβ
68hornsɛs
69tailkŕʉs
70featherkʉgot
71hairgŕɛsk
72headhäʊç
73earvæk
74eyeθɛt
75nosepʉh
76mouthglɛvä
77toothʝʉl
78tonguesäθ
79fingernailθɛäçɪʝ
80footʝʊv
81leghɪv
82kneeθɛɪh
83handvrɪt
84wingvoɪŕ
85bellylʊɪθ
86gutsopʊŕ
87neckŕʉɪs
88backprɛat
89breastlɪɛŕ
90heartðŕot
91liverɛllɪʊs
92drinkkæv
93eatgʊks
94bitekrol
95suckpʉɪŕk
96spitvɪɛt
97vomitʝʉɪç
98blowθæg
99breatheʝɪov
100laughpɪlk
101seeβlɪs
102heargrʊθ
103knowhʉɪŕ
104thinkɛβ
105smellkläv
106fearvɛst
107sleephʉɪv
108livevoɛl
109diegrʊç
110killgoɪt
111fightŕäβ
112huntβrær
113hitpræv
114cutpäθ
115splithʉɛθ
116stabvtʊr
117scratchʝrʊv
118digägrät
119swimʝʉɪθ
120flyŕɛhʉl
121walklæh
122comeplät
123liesɛŕθ
124sitäläp
125standʊrʉv
126turnɛpæŕ
127fallʝɪt
128giveçlʉs
129holdʝɪs
130squeezeskæβ
131rubʉθɪv
132washhɛäp
133wipekʉɪθ
134pullʝɪɛs
135pushploç
136throwgɛθs
137tieoɪg
138sewvçor
139countstŕoβ
140sayærɪt
141singɛlv
142playtræʝ
143floatɛhʉl
144flowgors
145freezeçävl
146swelltæsk
147sunglov
148moonproβ
149stargŕɪç
150waterçŕo
151rainçskɪät
152riverhʊɛt
153lakegrʉɛk
154seavärʝ
155saltprävæk
156stoneŕoht
157sandolg
158dustβrɪɛt
159earthpʊŕɛ
160cloudgræv
161foghoɛs
162skyʊθ
163windksäv
164snowβæp
165icetræh
166smokesŕæβ
167fireprʊv
168ashlʊç
169burnlʉçɪv
170roadtŕoɪʝ
171mountainplæt
172redpoɪθ
173greenaβrk
174yellowslɪg
175whitelʉhs
176blackkɪθ
177nightβŕʊ
178dayrɪɛl
179yearpæθ
180warmpŕʊt
181coldtrɪɛl
182fullθæɪl
183newsæg
184oldçɪsk
185goodʝoç
186badçʊl
187rottensʊβ
188dirtypŕɪç
189straightɛvlɪk
190roundvɛɪh
191sharphŕɪts
192dullægl
193smoothβɛssk
194wetroʊθ
195drykrɪs
196correctθol
197nearɛθk
198farŕɪvg
199rightvɛog
200leftopsɛk
201atlɪp
202inoθk
203withglɪθ
204andβɛk
205ifβŕäʝ
206becauseŕæç
207namevɛŕr


Example textEdit

ʆɛʉt vɛstäv poŕ hʊɛtʉr gæsk βɛk poŕ värʝʉr ŕɛst. Bɛʉt ŕɪgäçɛt poŕ ʊθʉr ɛçht βɛk poŕ  ksävʉr pŕot.

A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway

In the late summer of that year we lived in a house in a village that looked across the river and the plain to the mountains. In the bed of the river there were pebbles and boulders, dry and white in the sun, and the water was clear and swiftly moving and blue in the channels. Troops went by the house and down the road and the dust they raised powdered the leaves of the trees. The trunks of the trees too were dusty and the leaves fell early that year and we saw the troops marching along the road and the dust rising and leaves, stirred by the breeze, falling and the soldiers marching and afterward the road bare and white except for the leaves.

Ɛŕälær horl pæθɪβ poŕ hʉlʉt voɛloʝ θoŕʝäær skɛθtær βlɪsoʝ ʊɪç hʊɛtʉr βɛk kloŕʉr plætorl. Lɪoŕær hʊɛtɪβ ŕɪθ äplʉrl βɛk ɪrɪlkʉrl krɪs βɛk lʉhs glovær βɛk çŕoʉt ŕɪθ opŕäs βɛk θɛgt ʝʉɪtɛt βɛk θäŕg hɪŕæsærl. Ŕhʉɪçʉtl särtoʝ θoŕʝäæt βɛk glɪs troɪʝæt βɛk βrɪɛtʉt tsʉkoʝ goroβ pʉçæt läβorl çæŕɪβl. Bʊrlʉtl çæŕɪβl los ŕɪθoʝ βrɪɛtäç βɛk läβʉtl ʝɪtoʝ çɛrʊç pæθær βɛk hʉlʉt βlɪsoʝ ŕhʉɪçʉrl læhɛt ʝɪk troɪʝæt βɛk βrɪɛtʉrl tsʊkɛt βɛk läβʉrl θægʊç ksävoβ βɛk kæŕçʉrl læhɛt βɛk βɛlg troɪʝʉrl çŕætɪl βɛk lʉhs ʝŕɪk läβorl.

Farewell to arms

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki