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Liubishuhulandianese

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Liubishuhulandianese
Liubishuhu Vo
Type
Analytic
Alignment
Nominative-Accusative
Head direction
Final
Tonal
Yes
Declensions
No
Conjugations
Yes
Genders
No
Nouns decline according to...
Case Number
Definiteness Gender
Verbs conjugate according to...
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect



IntroductionEdit

Liubishuhulandianese is a language spoken in the UCN (Unofficial Confederate Nations), an international organization of nations located in Texas, Svalbard, Kerguelen, and other places around the world. The UCN actually exists, and considers the United Nations as unofficial. It is only called the Unofficial Confederate Nations so it won't get in trouble with the UN. With a culture so unique, the UCN needs a language to unite its Nations. Therefore, Liubishuhulandianese was created. Liubishuhulandianese is named after the UCN's first nation, Liubishuhuland. People of the UCN, especially of Liubishuhuland, use this language on a daily basis mainly for communication.

The script is written in a vertical cursive script. However, due to the diffusion of the Latin alphabet and the necessity to type Liubishuhulandianese, the language is also written with Latin letters without diacritics.

Pronunciation is rather difficult, as there are many phonemes, most of which are consonants. There are pulmonic consonants, affricates, co-articulated consonants, clicks, implosives, and ejectives, but pulmonic consonants are the most frequent. Some consonants are not found on the IPA chart.

Vocabulary is derivational, and since Liubishuhulandianese is a analytic language, there are a variety of grammatical particles. Each word in Liubishuhulandianese has a root form, which is usually a noun, verb, or adjective. By adding affixes, the part of speech and meaning of a word can change. Therefore, Liubishuhulandianese is not an isolating language. Liubishuhulandianese affixes are applied to most words, even to loan words, the majority of which originate in Mandarin Chinese. Greek, Latin, English, Arabic, and other languages also contribute to Liubishuhulandianese vocabulary.

Liubishuhulandian grammar is very straightforward and intuitive. Particles can be used to define subjects and predicates, show possession, and modify the sentence structure or tone. Inflection is nearly nonexistent in Liubishuhulandianese. Sentence structure is rather fluid and is based on context.

Liubishuhulandianese idea expression is vocabulary-based, meaning that sentences are to be interpreted literally and word-for-word. Prepositional idioms are not confusing because each preposition is only used in a specific set of situations. Lexical units are generally short, although there are a few idioms.

The name "Liubishuhulandianese" consists of two English demonymic suffixes, "-ian" and "-ese". This gives the impression of a place named "Liubishuhulandian", but the double suffix serves a purpose—to distinguish the language from the people. Hence, a Liubishuhulandian lives in Liubishuhuland and speaks Liubishuhulandianese. In Liubishuhulandianese, the word "Liubishuhu" is an adjective, and can modify the words "ren" and "vo", which mean "person/persons" and "language", respectively.

Phonology Edit

ConsonantsEdit

The IPA system is used here. Refer to the Alphabet section for Liubishuhulandianese graphology.

Bilabial Labio-dental Labio-lingual Bidental Dental Alveolar Palato-alveolar Retroflex Alveolo-palatal Palatal Velar Uvular Pharyngeal/

Epiglottal

Glottal
Nasal m ɱ n ɳ ɲ ŋ ɴ
Plosive p b p̪ b̪ t̼ d̼ t d ʈ ɖ c ɟ k g q ɢ ʡ ʔ
Fricative ɸ β f v θ̼ ð̼ h̪͆ ɦ̪͆ θ ð s z ʃ ʒ ʂ ʐ ɕ ʑ ç ʝ x ɣ χ ʁ ħ ʕ h
Approximant ɹ j ɰ
Trill r
Lateral fric. ɬ ɮ
Lateral app. l ʎ

Other consonants:

ǀ - tenuis dental click

ǁ - lateral coronal click

' - follows a consonant to make it an ejective

ɓ - bilabial implosive

ɗ - alveolar implosive

ʄ - palatal implosive

ɠ - velar implosive

ʛ - uvular implosive

d͡b - co-articulated /d/ and /b/

t͡p - co-articulated /t/ and /p/, aspirated

ɰʷ - labialized velar approximant ("w" sound in English)

Notes:

Most affricates are written with two separate, consecutive letters. See the Alphabet section for the exceptions "ch" and "j".

Unvoiced plosive consonants are aspirated to help distinguish them from their voiced (and unaspirated) counterparts.

VowelsEdit

Front Near-front Central Near-back Back
Close i y u
Near-close ɪ̈
Close-mid o
Mid ə
Open-mid ɛ œ
Near-open æ
Open a ä ɑ

Notes:

The vowels /ɛ/ and /ə/ are represented by the same letter: "e" in the Latin alphabet. Generally, it is pronounced /ɛ/ when stressed and /ə/ when unstressed. It is very important that the letter "e" is pronounced correctly in each instance.

The vowels /a/, /ä/, and /ɑ/ are represented by the same letter: "a" in the Latin alphabet. These phonemes can be used interchangeably. Most Liubishuhulandians use a mixture of all three vowels in speech and can hardly tell the difference between them.

Some Liubishuhulandianese words have tones, but they are not necessary in common speech and are not written. In educated speech, the use of tones for certain words is more common. Tones are mostly borrowed from Mandarin Chinese.

AlphabetEdit

Letter(s) a e i o u ae oe uu ee m p b fh vh mv pv bv f v mn pt bd wth wdh sf zv
Sound a, ä ɛ, ə i o u æ œ y ɪ̈ m p b ɸ β ɱ f v θ̼ ð̼ h̪͆ ɦ̪͆
Letter(s) th dh n t d s z rh r ll lz l sj zj nnh tth ddh sh zh x zy ny c dg cy gy
Sound θ ð n t d s z ɹ r ɬ ɮ l ʃ ʒ ɳ ʈ ɖ ʂ ʐ ɕ ʑ ɲ c ɟ ç ʝ
Letter(s) y ly ng k g hgh gh wr w nng qh gq h rgh qk hh ` - hx c' x' ' ~ ' dd ch j q nh db tp
Sound j ʎ ŋ k g x ɣ ɰ ɰʷ ɴ q ɢ χ ʁ ʡ ħ ʕ ʔ h ǀ ǀǀ ' N/A* N/A** N/A*** d͡b t͡p

Notes:

*The symbol "~" is placed between two consonants that are not meant to be pronounced as one sound. For example, "mv" would be pronounced as /ɱ/, but "m~v" would be pronounced as /mv/. Although some texts may still use the symbol "~", most have replaced it with"-".

**The symbol "'" (an apostrophe) makes the consonant before it an implosive consonant, but only if the consonant is repeated (i.e. written twice before the apostrophe).

***The letters "nh" nasalize the preceding vowel.

Liubishuhulandianese has its own scripts, the Liubishuhulandianese script, which is written in vertical cursive, and a New Liubishuhulandian script. However, both scripts are not available digitally.

The letters "rh" rhotacizes the vowel it follows and is pronounced if a vowel immediately follows it.

PhonotacticsEdit

There are few, if any, phonotactic constraints in Liubishuhulandianese. There is theoretically no limit on the number of consonants in the onset and coda of a word, and it is possible for a word to have no nucleus.

A Liubishuhulandianese word generator program is available for Windows, and can be requested at www.liubishuhuland.co.nr on the Contact page. The phonotactics of the generated words sometimes violate Liubishuhulandian pronunciation rules, for instance, when an implosive consonant is written as a simultaneous ejective consonant. Newer versions of the program will be released in the future as bugs are fixed.

GrammarEdit

Gender Cases Numbers Tenses Persons Moods Voices Aspects
Verb No No No Yes No No No Yes
Nouns No No No No No No No No
Adjectives No No No No No No No No
Numbers No No No No No No No No
Participles No No No No No No No No
Adverb No No No No No No No No
Pronouns No No Yes No No No No No
Adpositions No No No No No No No No
Article No No Yes No No No No No
Particle No No No No No No No No


Word Order Edit

Word order can appear in the following forms in the indicative and interrogative moods:

(S = subject/agent; V = verb; O = (direct) object; IO = indirect object; P = predicative modifier)

  1. S P ("bie" IO) ("ne"?)
  2. S "us" (O) V ("bie" IO) ("ne"?)
  3. S V ("ne"?)
  4. S V O ("bie" IO) ("ne"?)
  5. S "suu" O V ("bie" IO) ("ne"?)
  6. V S O ("bie" IO) ("ne"?)

The particles "bie" and "suu" must be succeeded by a object, which can take attributive modifiers. Modifiers will be explained later.

"Bie" is the indirect object marker for ditransitive verbs, while "suu" is the direct object marker for ditransitive or monotransitive verbs. An indirect object must always carry "bie", but "suu" must only be used before a object that appears before a subject.

The particle "ne" changes an otherwise indicative sentence into a question. The answer is either "leth" (yes) or "fo" (no). Questions ending with "ne" are asked out of inquiry—the asker does not expect any particular answer. The word "ne" can be replaced by the word "be", which is used in situations of confirmation. This means that the asker believes that the answer to the question will be "leth", and is only asking to make sure.

In the first listed sentence structure, the predicative modifier can be a predicative adjective or a present participle. No verb is needed.

The second listed sentence structure is a passive construction. It required a subject, the particle "us", which makes a verb passive, and a transitive verb. The object is the agent in this case, and can be omitted if desired. If the transitive verb is ditransitive, then "bie", followed by an indirect object, can be used.

Dependent Clauses Edit

Dependent clauses provide additional information to independent clauses, and there are several variations.

The Relative Clause Edit

Relative clauses are modifiers of nouns and pronouns. Relative clauses are formed by adding the pronoun "yim", which is the only relative pronoun in Liubishuhulandianese, to the beginning of an indicative clause of sentence structure 1-5. This indicative clause must not take interrogative particles and must also be free of the antecedent:

Ha ashfi su xiaodenz yim ha yo muq suu uu s ananas nieg denz bie.

Gloss: I like the child who/that/which I ('s) mother (O marker) a/one (unit) pineapple give (past tense marker) (IO marker).

Translation: I like the child whom my mother gave a pineapple to.

Notice that the particle "bie" comes with no indirect object. The IO is actually the pronoun "yim", whose antecedent is the direct object, "su xiaodenz", in the independent clause. The antecedent and the pronoun "yim" can be subjects, direct objects, and indirect objects, and no declension is necessary at all.

The particle "yo" shows possession, so the relative possessive pronoun, "whose", is "yim yo", which can be used for any antecedent, not just a person or personified object:

Nat ya su tesu yim yo tesuqi klori.

Gloss: That be the country who/that/which ('s) country-flag green.

Translation: That is the country whose national flag is green.

Some relatives adverbs such as "narhdenz" (where) and "sherhdenz" (when) can be used in place of yim. "Nardenz" can follow prepositions to form two-word relative adverbs such as "fha narhdenz" (whither) and "afh narhdenz" (whence). "Ge yim" translates to "for which", and means "why" when used as a relative adverb:

Ha fo fhiddhallae su nyathic' ge yim ta fo ashfi ananas.

Gloss: I not know the reason for which he/she not like pineapple.

Translation: I do not know the reason why he/she does not like pineapple.

The Noun Clause Edit

Noun clauses are embedded in a sentence and can follow the word "yim", although "yim" is not required. The noun clause can follow the following types of words:

  • Verbs of thinking: zhen (think), fhiddhallae (know), etc.
  • Verbs of saying: pehe (say), oeqqha (lie), zufanh (sing), etc.
  • Certain nouns: ishc'e (idea), oeqqhai (lie), keneshi (possibility), etc.
  • Adjectives of feeling: sfuuxden (happy), fosfuuxden (unhappy), etc.

The noun clause does not have to immediately follow a word of the aforementioned types:

Fhiddhallae sisuu yim su xiaodenz fo wak su s ananas denz ne?

Gloss: Know you-plural that the child not eat the (unit) pineapple (past tense marker) (interrogative particle)?

Translation: Do you know that the child did not eat the pineapple?

The Adverbial Clause Edit

Adverbial clauses will be discussed in the Conjunctions section.

Verbs Edit

Conjugation Edit

Verbs in Liubishuhulandianese do not inflect, but they conjugate based on tenses and aspects with grammatical particles.

Simple Progressive Perfect Experiential Habitual Prospective
Present V soshi V qva V V eem wdhuu V bva V
Past V denz soshi V denz qva V denz V eem denz wdhuu V denz bva V denz
Perfect le V le soshi V le qva V le V eem le wdhuu V le bva V

The habitual aspect is used more commonly in writing and in educated speech. In colloquial speech, the simple aspect can be used in place of the habitual aspect:

Habitual: Ha wdhuu goen alas vhan dethbi.

Gloss: I (habitual aspect marker) go-to school each/every day.

Translation: I go to school every day.

Simple: Ha goen alas vhan dethbi.

Gloss: I go-to school each/every day.

Translation: I go to school each day.

In this case, "vhan" is interpreted as "every" when used to modify a habitual verb, but is interpreted as "each" when used to modify a simple verb. This is due to the fact that each instance of the verb's action is viewed as separate in the simple aspect. In the habitual aspect, though, each instance of the verb's action is viewed as a member of a set of repeated actions. In colloquial speech, the difference between "every" and "each" is almost nonexistent.

Modal Verbs Edit

Modal verbs are the following:

  • Ken - can, could, to have ability
  • Var - would, to have willingness or desire
  • In-ge - should, to have obligation or duty
  • Zh`en - may, to have permission
  • Bix - must, to have necessity
  • Dda - might, to have possibility
  • Sjaeth - dare, to have courage or defiance
  • Le - will, to have future inevitability

Modal verbs also fully conjugate, making Liubishuhulandianese unlike many other languages:

Ha le dda zh`en wak su s ananas.

Gloss: I will might may eat the (unit) pineapple.

Translation: In the future, I might have permission to eat the pineapple.

Nouns, Pronouns, and Determiners Edit

Nouns do not decline in Liubishuhulandianese.

Pronouns and Determiners Edit

Pronouns take the place of nouns, and come in several types: personal, demonstrative, relative, interrogative, indefinite, and quantifier pronouns.

Many pronouns can also be used as determiners to provide contextual information about the nouns they precede. Determiners always precede nouns.

Personal Pronouns Edit

Personal pronouns are pluralized by adding the suffix "-suu".

1st Person 2nd Person 3rd Person
Singular Ha Si Ta
Plural Hasuu Sisuu Tasuu

The third person pronouns are not gender-specific.

The 1st personal plural pronoun "hasuu" can be either exclusive or inclusive, depending on context.

There is no "formal you" in Liubishuhulandianese.

Demonstrative Pronouns and Determiners Edit

Demonstrative pronouns are pluralized in the same way as personal pronouns are. All demonstrative pronouns can be used as determiners.

Proximal Distal
Singular Zheh Nat
Plural Zhehsuu Natsuu
Relative Pronoun Edit

The relative pronoun in Liubishuhulandian is "yim", which can mean "who", "that", or "which".

Interrogative Pronouns Edit

Liubishuhulandianese interrogative pronouns do not decline and do not have to be fronted.

Each of these three pronouns has a possessive form, which is used only as a pronoun.

Pronoun English Determiner Possessive Form
Gis Who No Gis yo
Shendenz What Yes Shendenz yo
Wthe Which Yes Wthe yo

Ta ya gis? OR Gis ya ta?

Gloss: He/she be who? OR Who be he/she?

Translation: Who is he/she?

In this case, "gis" is used as a pronoun. "Shendenz" and "wthe" can be used as determiners. For example:

Wthe ren la uu giao?

Gloss: Which person(s) have a/one cat?

Translation: Which persons(s) has/have a cat?

Notice that interrogative pronouns have no plurality.

Indefinite Pronouns Edit

Indefinite pronouns can also be used as determiners. They can be used for people and objects and have singular, dual, and plural forms. "Bing" ("both") is the only dual indefinite pronoun that is treated as a plural pronoun. The other two dual indefinite pronouns are treated as singular pronouns.

Negative Universal Assertive Existential Elective Existential
Singular Ofvhan (nobody, nothing) vhan (everybody, everything) ex (somebody, something) dhen (anybody, anything)
Dual Ofbing (neither) bing (both) N/A Lyam (either)
Plural Ofsuodenz (none) suodenz (all) ex (some) dhen (any)

Each of these words can function as a pronoun when by itself and when part of a possessive construction.

Ofvhan ashfi ananas.

Gloss: Nobody/nothing like pineapple.

Translation: Nobody* likes pineapple.

This instance of "ofvhan" is not used in a possessive construction. Compare this to the following:

Ofvhan oyo hasuu ashfi ananas.

Gloss: Nobody/nothing of we like pineapple.

Translation: Out of us, nobody likes pineapple.

*"Ofvhan" should technically translate to "nobody OR nothing", but the meaning is usually implied from context. In this case, "ofvhan" is "nobody" because things cannot like pineapple. If the sentence were part of a text where certain things could like pineapple, then "ofvhan" could mean "nothing".

Each of these indefinite pronouns can also be used as a determiner. The top row's words would change slightly:

  • Ofvhan becomes "no"
  • Vhan becomes "every" or "each"
  • Ex becomes "some"
  • Dhen becomes "any"

The possessive forms are formed be adding "yo" to the end of the individual pronouns.

Quantifier Pronouns Edit

Quantifier pronouns can be used as pronouns in the same two ways as indefinite pronouns can, and they can also be used as determiners.

All quantifier pronouns are singular.

English Liubishuhulandianese
Enough Gou
Plenty Foak
Little, Few Ak
Less, Fewer C'imak
Least, Fewest (the minority) Canh'ak
Much, Many Ka
More C'imka
Most (the majority) Canhka

"Ak" and "ka" are also adjectives and mean "little/few" and "much/many", respectively. "C'im" and "canh" are adverbs by themselves and form the comparative and superlative forms of adjectives.

Canh'ak oyo hasuu pfiern li sui c'ic'i.

Gloss: Least/fewest of we live in the-plural city.

Translation: The minority of us live in the cities.

This sentence can also do without the prepositional phrase "oyo hasuu" ("of us").

"Canh ak" (as two separate words) can be used as a predicative adjective:

Sui ren li nat c'ic'i canh ak.

Gloss: The-plural person in that city most-adv little/few.

Translation: The persons in that city are the fewest.

Quantifier pronouns can take "yo" to become possessive:

Hasuu yo ka yo s ananas da.

Gloss: We ('s) much/many ('s) (unit) pineapple big.

Translation: The pineapples of many of us are big.

Here, the plurality of "ananas" ("pineapple") is inferred.

Reflexive Pronouns Edit

To make a pronoun reflexive, add the suffix "-meecy".

Si fo in-ge wak simeecy.

Gloss: You not should eat yourself.

Translation: You should not eat yourself.

Nouns Edit

Liubishuhulandianese nouns do not decline; hence, a noun by itself cannot reveal its plurality. To understand this, one must first understand countability and articles.

Countability Edit

Countable nouns, as the name suggests, can be counted. To assign a number to a noun is easy—one needs only to modify the noun by placing a number (which is an adjective) before the noun:

qke giao

Gloss: two cat

Translation: two cats

The number one, "uu", is also the indefinite article and makes the noun singular. Zero, "yu", makes the noun plural:

Yu giao wdhuu wak uu ananas vhan dethbi.

Gloss: Zero cat (habitual aspect marker) eat a/one pineapple each/every day.

Translation: Zero cats eat a pineapple every day.

This is the same as the following:

Ofvhan giao wdhuu wak uu ananas vhan dethbi.

Gloss: No cat (habitual aspect marker) eat a/one pineapple each/every day.

Translation: No cat eats a pineapple every day.

Uncountable nouns are nouns that cannot be modified by numbers. For example, it would not be correct to say "one milk". In Liubishuhulandianese, concepts, substances, etc. are uncountable unless they take measure words. Measure words are used with numbers to indicate the amount or quantity of something:

Ha eeim uu bb'as-f'i dzhrhaex'a.

Gloss: I drink a/one cup milk.

Translation: I drink a cup of milk.

Here, the word "bb'as-f'i" ("cup") is the measure word for "dzhrhaex'a" ("milk"). "Bb'as-f'i" and other measure words can also be used with countable nouns. For example:

bb'as-f'i nimunimu

Gloss: cup grape

Translation: cup of grapes

"Nimunimu" is plural because it is a countable noun that follows a measure word. This is true for all countable nouns:

Zheh ya uu muav ren yim fo ashfi tasuumeecy.

Gloss: This is a/one group person who/that/which not like themselves.

Translation: This is a group of people who do not like themselves.

Usually, though, the plurality of the countable noun after a measure word in unimportant in the context.

Articles Edit

There are three articles in Liubishuhulandianese, as shown below.

Definite Indefinite
Singular Su Uu
Plural Sui N/A

To make a definite noun plural, simply change the "su" to "sui". To make an indefinite noun plural, change "uu" to a number, the dual indefinite pronoun "bing" ("both"), or a plural indefinite pronoun. When uncountable nouns are used in the four forms, the meanings change slightly.

A uncountable noun in its default form takes no article, number, or pronoun. Measure words accompany uncountable nouns in the default form. However, articles, numbers, and pronouns can be used with uncountable nouns. The table below explains.

KeyMW = measure word

DF = default form

NB = number

PN = pronoun

Definite Indefinite
Singular The noun follows "su", "zheh", or "nat",

existing in the form

Su/PN + DF.

This means

Su/PN (+MW) +DF.

The noun follows "uu",

existing in the form

Uu + DF.

This means

Uu (+MW) + DF.

Plural The noun follows "sui", "zhehsuu", or "natsuu",

existing in the form

Sui/PN + DF.

This means

Sui/PN (+MW) +DF.

The noun follows a number (not "uu"),

"bing", or a plural indefinite pronoun,

existing in the form

NB/PN + DF.

This means

NB/PN (+MW) + DF.

In all four cases, the meaning implies that the uncountable noun exists in one or more forms. For instance, milk can exist in cup-form or jar-form. However, when used in these four cases, the measure word's meaning is not important:

Ha le eeim natsuu dzhrhaex'a.

Gloss: I will drink those milk.

Translation: I will drink those (cups/jars/puddles/bowls/pails, etc. of) milk.

Which measure word should be used, then? It is either unimportant of context-based.

Some words in Liubishuhulandianese can be countable and uncountable. For example, "ananas", or "pineapple", can be both a fruit or the material that makes up the edible fruit. If this word is used without an article, pronoun, or number, it is implied that it is uncountable, but if it is used with them, for example, in the words "sui ananas", this can either mean "the (e.g. cups of) pineapple (material)" or "the pineapples". To distinguish between the two, the measure word "s" can be used with the countable noun if necessary. Therefore, the better way to say "the pineapples" would be "sui s ananas", or "the continuous thing composed of pineapple material". The word "s" roughly translates to "thing composed of the material of", or more preferably, "unit of". Essentially, this form uses a countable noun like an uncountable noun.

Some singular definite nouns can be used without an article or demonstrative pronoun. These nouns are said to carry the "zero article". The zero article is used with proper nouns or other nouns that are clearly singular indefinite. The following is a list of a few zero article nouns:

  • Alas - school
  • Maill - church
  • Irrghai - hospital
  • Rhidda - bed

Ha bix goen irrghai.

Gloss: I must go hospital.

Translation: I must go to the hospital.

Noun Modifiers Edit

Adjectives and yo-clauses can modify nouns.

Adjectives do not inflect and always come before nouns. There is no distinction between coordinate and cumulative adjectives, but it is a general truth that adjectives closer to the noun are considered more important to the noun:

su xiao dhrub`ac'i nimunimu

Gloss: the small round grape

Translation: the small round grape OR the small, round grape.

The first translation involves cumulative adjectives, while the second involves coordinate adjectives. In Liubishuhulandianese, the meaning is like both translations. The grape is both a grape that is red and round and a round grape that is red. In fact, it is a grape that is more importantly round than it is red.

Yo-clauses use the word "yo" before a noun and after a clause that does not include the noun it modifies:

soshi wak yo ren

Gloss: (progressive aspect marker) eat ('s) person

Translation: the eating person(s) OR the person(s) who is/are eating

Other clause structures can also be used:

Ha ashfi su ha yo muq suu uu s ananas nieg denz bie yo xiaodenz.

Gloss: I like the I ('s) mother (direct object marker) a/one (unit) pineapple give (past tense marker) (indirect object marker) ('s) child.

Translation: I like the child whom my mother gave a pineapple to.

Compare this sentence to the following earlier example:

Ha ashfi su xiaodenz yim ha yo muq suu uu s ananas nieg denz bie.

The only difference is that the first sentence uses a yo-clause while the second uses a relative clause. Generally, yo-clauses are more restrictive than relative clauses. This means that yo-clauses are more essential to sentences than are relative clauses.

Adpositions Edit

Adpositions come before their objects (and therefore are prepositions), and the adpositional phrase can be placed anywhere in the sentence, preferably closer to the verb the phrase modifies than to another verb.

Adpositions are used only in the specific contexts given in the Clarification column. Prepositional idioms are relatively few and are usually expressed by one verb. For example, "succeed in" is "tsjeeddab", and "go to" is "goen".

Liubishuhulandianese English Clarification
Li In "in a house"
Il On "on the table"
Me Into "into the room"
Em Onto "onto the stage"
Mesh With "with a friend"
Shem Via "via deception"
Fha To "How far is it to the park?", "from here to there", equivalent to Chinese "到", but never used as a verb; "To me, it tastes bad."
Oyo Of "of the teacher", expressed possession
Nngum About "talk about"
Ardzh Up above, over, "up the ladder", "above the couch", "over the mat"
Dzhar Down below, under, underneath, "down the stairs", "below the chair", "under the book"
Rhedzh Across across from, "across the street", "across from the office"
Rak Against in opposition (to a force), "against the wind", "against the reforms", NOT "lean against the wall"
Xeevh Along on a path, "along the road"
Dda-in Among "among the audience"
Fes~h Around within an area around a certain point of reference, "around the table"
Ip As the second "as" in an "as-as" simile, "white as snow", NOT "As I did this, I also did that."
Soshi At "at the store"
Alfen Toward facing, "toward the sun"
Nloh Before also conjunction or adverb, "before breakfast"
Hepll Behind "behind the door"
Miazhve Beyond "beyond the mountains"
Ga By next to, "By the magazine is the water bottle."
The By created by, "written by Napoleon", used rarely
Gueif Considering also conjunction, "Considering the options, this choice is best."
Ling During "during the dance"
Gell Except except for, "All did except Sam."
Ge For "a gift for my mother"
Afh From used commonly with "fha" ("to"), "from the airport", "from here to there"
Piken Like resembling, "like a rose"
Hhiazh Like for example, such as, "a person like her"
X'ia Minus used like "gell" ("except") when not mathematical, "four minus one", "minus the cheese"
C'ien Plus used like "un" ("and") when not mathematical, "pi plus eight", "soup plus a side"
Sjik Times "nine times nine"
Lyatll Divided by "one divided by one"
Ben Out of "two out of three" (two-thirds), "Out of all of them, only one has not graduated."
Zhib Off off, off from, off of, "Get off the roof!", "He's already off the seesaw."
Toe Through "through the forest"
Fomesh Without "without a pen"

Vocabulary Edit


No. English Liubishuhulandianese
1IHa
2you (singular)Si
3heTa
4weHasuu
5you (plural)Sisuu
6theyTasuu
7thisZheh
8thatNat
9hereZhehlin
10thereNatlin
11whoGis
12whatShendenz
13whereNarhdenz
14whenSherhdenz
15howDzendenz
16notFo
17allSuodenz
18manyContionary_Wiki
19someSu
20fewContionary_Wiki
21otherContionary_Wiki
22oneUu
23twoQke
24threeNil
25fourHum
26fiveWa
27bigDa
28longContionary_Wiki
29wideContionary_Wiki
30thickContionary_Wiki
31heavyChen
32smallXiao
33shortContionary_Wiki
34narrowContionary_Wiki
35thinContionary_Wiki
36womanContionary_Wiki
37man (adult male)Contionary_Wiki
38man (human being)Kin
39childXiaodenz
40wifeContionary_Wiki
41husbandContionary_Wiki
42motherMadenz
43fatherBadenz
44animalContionary_Wiki
45fishContionary_Wiki
46birdContionary_Wiki
47dogContionary_Wiki
48louseContionary_Wiki
49snakeContionary_Wiki
50wormContionary_Wiki
51treeContionary_Wiki
52forestContionary_Wiki
53stickContionary_Wiki
54fruitGwordenz
55seedContionary_Wiki
56leafContionary_Wiki
57rootContionary_Wiki
58barkContionary_Wiki
59flowerContionary_Wiki
60grassContionary_Wiki
61ropeContionary_Wiki
62skinContionary_Wiki
63meatContionary_Wiki
64bloodXie
65boneContionary_Wiki
66fatContionary_Wiki
67eggDenz
68hornContionary_Wiki
69tailContionary_Wiki
70featherContionary_Wiki
71hairContionary_Wiki
72headContionary_Wiki
73earContionary_Wiki
74eyeContionary_Wiki
75noseContionary_Wiki
76mouthContionary_Wiki
77toothContionary_Wiki
78tongueContionary_Wiki
79fingernailContionary_Wiki
80footContionary_Wiki
81legContionary_Wiki
82kneeContionary_Wiki
83handContionary_Wiki
84wingContionary_Wiki
85bellyContionary_Wiki
86gutsContionary_Wiki
87neckContionary_Wiki
88backContionary_Wiki
89breastContionary_Wiki
90heartContionary_Wiki
91liverContionary_Wiki
92drinkContionary_Wiki
93eatDdob
94biteContionary_Wiki
95suckContionary_Wiki
96spitLuu
97vomitContionary_Wiki
98blowContionary_Wiki
99breatheContionary_Wiki
100laughContionary_Wiki
101seeKandenz
102hearTingdenz
103knowFhiddhallae
104thinkZhen
105smellVendenz
106fearContionary_Wiki
107sleepContionary_Wiki
108liveContionary_Wiki
109dieSeedan
110killContionary_Wiki
111fightContionary_Wiki
112huntContionary_Wiki
113hitContionary_Wiki
114cutContionary_Wiki
115splitContionary_Wiki
116stabContionary_Wiki
117scratchContionary_Wiki
118digContionary_Wiki
119swimContionary_Wiki
120flyContionary_Wiki
121walkContionary_Wiki
122comeLaidenz
123lieContionary_Wiki
124sitContionary_Wiki
125standDzhandan
126turnContionary_Wiki
127fallDzhuoniobidekeke
128giveContionary_Wiki
129holdContionary_Wiki
130squeezeContionary_Wiki
131rubContionary_Wiki
132washContionary_Wiki
133wipeContionary_Wiki
134pullContionary_Wiki
135pushContionary_Wiki
136throwContionary_Wiki
137tieContionary_Wiki
138sewContionary_Wiki
139countUkubala
140sayPehe
141singContionary_Wiki
142playContionary_Wiki
143floatContionary_Wiki
144flowContionary_Wiki
145freezeContionary_Wiki
146swellContionary_Wiki
147sunContionary_Wiki
148moonContionary_Wiki
149starXingdenzdan
150waterContionary_Wiki
151rainContionary_Wiki
152riverContionary_Wiki
153lakeContionary_Wiki
154seaContionary_Wiki
155saltContionary_Wiki
156stoneContionary_Wiki
157sandContionary_Wiki
158dustContionary_Wiki
159earthContionary_Wiki
160cloudContionary_Wiki
161fogContionary_Wiki
162skyContionary_Wiki
163windContionary_Wiki
164snowContionary_Wiki
165iceContionary_Wiki
166smokeContionary_Wiki
167fireContionary_Wiki
168ashContionary_Wiki
169burnContionary_Wiki
170roadContionary_Wiki
171mountainContionary_Wiki
172redErithro
173greenKlori
174yellowZantho
175whiteBlanka
176blackNegro
177nightIbthed
178dayDethbi
179yearContionary_Wiki
180warmContionary_Wiki
181coldContionary_Wiki
182fullContionary_Wiki
183newContionary_Wiki
184oldContionary_Wiki
185goodHru
186badHuag
187rottenContionary_Wiki
188dirtyContionary_Wiki
189straightContionary_Wiki
190roundContionary_Wiki
191sharpContionary_Wiki
192dullContionary_Wiki
193smoothContionary_Wiki
194wetContionary_Wiki
195dryContionary_Wiki
196correctLeth
197nearContionary_Wiki
198farContionary_Wiki
199rightContionary_Wiki
200leftContionary_Wiki
201atSoshi
202inLi
203withContionary_Wiki
204andUn
205ifRu
206becauseYin
207nameContionary_Wiki


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