Fandom

Conlang

Mirbha

3,201articles on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk1 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

SettingEdit

Mirbha is a fictional language spoken by the Humans in the Kingdom of Ra'mah, located in the Western Lands deep within the Azylia Desert.

PronunciationEdit

Pronunciation may be not a topic to get a headache, but also is not as simple as it should be.

ConsonantsEdit

  • B, D, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, P, R, S, T, V, W, Z are common.
  • C, X, Y only on foreign words.
  • B, D sound aspirated similar to its strong opposites P, T at the end of a word; in other cases are soft non-aspirated.
  • G has the same cases as in german.
  • H has two particular sounds: aspirated_soft only at the beginning/end of a word as english H; silent_paused as russian ь in the middle of a word.
  • F, K, P, T always aspirated, & aspirated_long at the end of a word.
  • J sounds at the end of a word as english SH; in other cases as in english.
  • L is rounded as in english when it intersects with letters: R, C, K, P. In other cases as in Spanish. Silent behind fricatives like C, S, SH, & Z.
  • M turns labiodental written before F & V. In other cases bilabial.
  • N after a vowel creates a nasal vowel sound; in other cases like german N.
  • R is always rounded as in spanish.
  • S, Z, V, W sound always as in English.

Digraphs & Special CharactersEdit

  • Kh is always as spanish J.
  • Š has the same sound as english Sh.
  • Ch has the same sound as english Ch.

BiliteralsEdit

  • Lc: letter L is silent, and C sounds as S.


Silent CombinationsEdit

  • -euren sound like german combination -üer-.

Syntax Edit

Mirbha uses a different word order than English.

Normal SentencesEdit

  • English: Subject Verb Object --> I learn Mirbha.
  • Mirbha: Subject Object Verb --> (Ana) Dušli vaškha.

Imperative SentencesEdit

  • English: Verb Place Adverb --> Come here now!
  • Mirbha: Verb Adverb Place --> Lakht ni kant!

Interrogative SentencesEdit

  • English: Adverb Aux.Verb Subject Verb --> Do you like to draw?
  • Mirbha: Subject Verb Object Verb Aux. Particle --> To mikharded mishod ast?

Negative SentencesEdit

1) Negating the noun with definite article.

  • English: Subject Verb Neg. Particle Object --> He has no sorrow.
  • Mirbha: Subject Neg. Particle Start Object Neg. Particle End Verb --> Het waal milva mitt kaazash.

1) Negating the noun without articles.

  • English: Subject Verb Neg. Particle Object --> Not many people come.
  • Mirbha: Subject Object Neg. Particle Verb --> Hatud min lakhant.

Basic Conversation Edit

Basic GrammarEdit

Words can differ in nouns, adjectives, adverbs, verbs, prepositions, & conjunctions.

Positive & Negative FormsEdit

Simply we use "da" for affirmative answers & "ne" for negative ones.

To negate a verb action depends if the verb is transitive or not, we use: zen for transitiv, & ze for intransitive.

Nouns Edit

In this language, the plurals are determined by strict rules depending if its an unanimated noun, or an animated noun (how to know if a noun is unanimated or animated? Easy, if it has life is animated, if not you know), & if its termination ends plosive or not which determines if its weak or strong.

CasesEdit

Now that we know the two types of nouns: animated & unanimated, nouns are also inflected by 6 cases: Nominative, Accusative, Dative, Genitive, Locative, & Comparative. But these 6 cases not only inflect nouns, but also inflect adjectives, pronouns, numbers, articles, & prepositions.


  • Nominative: Is one of the grammatical cases of a noun or other part of the speech, which generally marks the subject of a verb. (Generally is a noun or pronoun that is doing something.)
  • Accusative: Is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb. The same case is used in many languages for the objects of (some or all) prepositions. (It is a noun that is having something done to it, usually joined.)
  • Dative: Is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given. (For example, in "John gave Mary a book".)
  • Genitive: Is the case that marks a noun as modifying another noun. It often marks a noun as being the possessor of another noun but it can also indicate various relationships other than possession; certain verbs may take arguments in the genitive case; and it may have adverbial uses. Modern English does not typically mark nouns for a genitive case morphologically – rather, it uses the apostrophe ’s or a preposition (usually of) – but the personal pronouns do have distinct possessive forms. 'But here in Mirbha is the case' of a noun being possessor of another noun, it also excludes the english verb "to have".
  • Locative: Is a grammatical case which indicates a location. It corresponds vaguely to the English prepositions "in", "on", "at", and "by". The locative case belongs to the general local cases together with the lative and sepparative case. We use 6 locative cases: illative, inessive, elative, allative, adessive, & ablative.
  • Comparative: Is a grammatical case to mark a likeness to something. Excluding totally the verb "to like" used on comparisons.

GendersEdit

On Mirbha nouns only have two genders: masculine & femenine.

Masculine nouns tend to end in the nominative case in: consonants, vowel -i.

Femenine nouns tend to end in the nominative case in: vowels -ä.

Weak & Strong NounsEdit

VerbsEdit

{COMING AFTER THE TOPIC: NOUNS}

PronounsEdit

Personal PronounsEdit

Personal Pronouns are affected by Gender, Number, Case.

NOMINATIVE

SINGULAR

MASCULINE

FEMENINE

UNANIMATED

FORMAL

FIRST

ana

ana

----------------------------

SECOND

to

ata

----------------------------

THIRD

hun

hiya

hun

NOMINATIVE

PLURAL

MASCULINE

FEMENINE

UNANIMATED

FORMAL

FIRST

šma šma ----------------------------

SECOND

antim

antuma

----------------------------

THIRD

kum kula kum

Numbers Edit

{COMING AFTER FINNISHING THE TOPIC: NOUNS}

Basic Vocabulary Edit

AL HADIM KIDAKH – DAYS OF THE WEEK

MIRBHA TRANSLATION
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday


AL ZOHAV – COLOURS

MIRBHA TRANSLATION
Red
Blue
Yellow
Green
Purple
Orange
Gray
Brown
Black
White

DictionaryEdit

Link to the Dictionary:

http://conlang.wikia.com/wiki/Mirbha_Dictionary

Example textEdit

...

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki