Fandom

Conlang

Molivianic

3,197articles on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.


Progress 87%

 

Molivianic
Molive'anic
Type
Inflecting
Alignment
Head direction
Tonal
No
Declensions
Yes
Conjugations
Yes
Genders
5
Nouns decline according to...
Case Number
Definiteness Gender
Verbs conjugate according to...
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect



General informationEdit

Molivianic is the oldest known language in Molive'ane'a, and is the language from which all other languages draw. It is the official language of the elders, and the official language of commerce, science, air travel, and the kingdom of Molive'ane'a. It is spoken by about 1.9 billion as a first language, 4.1 billion as a second language, and 1.9 billion as a third or later language. 

Note, the history of the language spelled out here, and the history of the language as it relates to the conlang world found on here do conflict. Go by what is found here.

PhonologyEdit

ConsonantsEdit

Bilabial Labio-dental Dental Alveolar Post-alveolar Palatal Velar Uvular Glottal
Nasal m /m/ n /n/ g' /ŋ/
Plosive p /p/
b /b/
t /t/
d /d/
c /k/
g /g/
Fricative b' /β/ f /f/
v /v/
cc /ð/ s /s/
s' /z/
sh' /ʃ/ ch' /x/ h /h/
Approximant r /ɹ/ j' /j/ w /w/
Lateral app. l /l/

VowelsEdit

Front Near-front Central Near-back Back
Close e' /i/ o' /u/
Near-close i /ɪ/
Close-mid a' /e/ o /oʊ/
Mid
Open-mid e /ɛ/ u /ʌ/
Near-open
Open a /a/

DipthongsEdit

Ai : /aɪ/

AlphabetEdit

AA'BB'DEE'FGG'HICLMNOPRSS'TVWJ'( aa'bb'cdee'fgg'hiclmnoprss'tvwj')

CcCh'Sh' (ccch'hs')

Ai (ai)

Words and StressEdit

The smallest possible syllable, or word in some cases, is a vowel with a ˆ on it (î, ô). The most number of consonants allowed next to each is three, and they must be followed by ë' or ä'. Other than, there are very few rules about syllables and words in Molivianic

Stress follows these rules: if there is a vowel is ˆ, it is the stressed vowel. If that does not exist in a sentences, then the first vowel with ´ carries the stress. Otherwise the first vowel carries the stress. Note that in words that have dipthongs, or vowels that appear in pairs, the first vowel always carries the stress. 

The phrase "ine," has a slightly different pronunciation, it is pronounced /ain/, with a long i and a silent e.

GrammarEdit

Gender Cases Numbers Tenses Persons Moods Voices Aspects
Verb No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Nouns Yes Yes Yes No No No No No
Adjectives Yes No Yes No No No No No
Numbers No No No No No No No No
Participles No No No No No No No No
Adverb Yes No Yes No No No No No
Pronouns Yes Yes Yes No No No No No
Adpositions No No No No No No No No
Article Yes No Yes No No No No No
Particle No No No No No No No No

Molivianic is SVO oriented, most of the time. 

Common Sentance Order
Noun/Pronoun (Subject) Verb Object

A subject acts on an object rhough a verb. In commands, it becomes VSO. (Verb, subject, command). In the passive voice, it becomes OVS

VerbsEdit

Voices: Active, Passive

Moods: Indicative, Subjunctive, "Descriptive," Imperative.

Irregular Verbs: nó'ret (to be), b'éch'et (to go), páwet (to have).

Negating a verb: add osh'n before the verb (i.e. osh'n e'te'tóta'vn, Don't do ___). osh'n is also the word for no in general.

When conjugation, the last 2 letters (usually "et") drop, similar to conjugations in Spanish. All verbs will have a consonant at the end of the stem after et is dropped, even if the stem has to change. Conjugations are added to the end after the "et" drops off.

Verbs in the subjunctive, in addition to requiring a suffix, require a prefix to show what aspect of the subjunctive is being used. 

  • Some verbs only differ by accents. 

The verb to do is regular, te'tótet

Regular Verbs
Indicative Mood (Actions)
Active Voice
Singular Plural
1st 2nd 3rd 1st 2nd 3rd
Present Simple te'tótucc te'tóto'ma te'tóta'pém te'tóte'lpó' te'tóto'me te'tótalva
Present Continuous te'tótumn te'tótomna te'tótalcnä' te'tóte'ccmnë' t'etótô te'tótalca
Present Perfect* te'tótúmn te'tótolcc te'tótacce' te'tóte'lta te'tóto'lcas te'tóta's'acc
Present Perfect Continuous* te'tótuplnë' te'tótô' te'tóta'lmnä' te'tótentemna te'tóto'nte te'tóta'mnaj'
Past Simple te'tótúcola te'tóto'ma te'tóta'pem te'tótelpo' te'tótopan te'tóta'sna
Past Perfect te'tótuca'le te'tótostan te'tóta'mncë' te'tótemna te'tóto'mne' te'tótalcnë'
Past Continuous* te'tótumne te'tótocca's' te'tóta'mptë' te'tótemna' te'tótovltä' te'tótasntë'
Past Imperfect te'tótuvna te'tótovna' te'tóta'mve' te'tóteva te'tótowvil te'tótalsnë'
Past Perfect Continuous* te'tótuvní te'tótowlnë' te'tóta'wl te'tótemit te'tótomo't te'tóta'slnë'
Future Simple te'tótunp te'tótompnë' te'tótâ' te'tóteltnë' te'tótowle' te'tóta'lvcä'
Future Perfect te'tótulva te'tótolträ' te'tóta'latro te'tóteno' te'tótone' te'tóta'mno
Future Continuous* te'tótunmpë' te'tótonolt te'tótâ te'tótelmó' te'tótos'na' te'tóta'mnó'
Future Perfect Continuous* te'tótutle te'tótos'a te'tótas'e' te'tóteolt te'tótolite' te'tóta'sch'
Reflexive** te'tótul te'tótol te'tóta'l te'tóte'l te'tóto'l te'tótal
Passive Voice (The book was moved by her)
Present Simple te'tóta'mno' te'tóte'li te'tótiltnë' te'tóto'lce' te'tótum te'tótacc
Present Perfect te'tóta'lvnä' te'tótê' te'tóto'me' te'tótumol te'tótác te'tótac
Present Continuous te'tóta'loc te'tóte'lcnä' te'tótî te'tótó'lc te'tótúlmnë' te'tótas'na'
Present Perfect Continuous te'tóta'p te'tóte'lapn te'tótilc te'tóto'nlo te'tótulme' te'tótastnë'
Past Simple te'tóta'mpo te'tóte'va te'tótilcnë' te'tóto'nlav te'tótume' te'tótavnos
Past Perfect te'tóta'sno te'tóte'snó te'tótiln te'tóto'lna te'tótuvmnë' te'tótavmnä'
Past Imperfect te'tóta'vna te'tóte'mnal te'tótilvnë' te'tóto'vma te'tótulctä' te'tótávmnë'
Past Continuous te'tóta'vna te'tóte'lc te'tótivle te'tóto'mné' te'tótucc te'tótaccne
Past Perfect Continuous te'tóta'lvnë' te'tóte'mn te'tótilt te'tóto'mvnä' te'tótucni te'tótaccin
Future Simple te'tóta'ccnil te'tóte'cc te'tótimno te'tóto'mnai te'tótuccti te'tótanli
Future Perfect te'tóta'vno te'tóte'ccn te'tótilcc te'tóto'tna te'tótutne' te'tótalgnë'
Future Continuous te'tóta'tli te'tóte'tle'cc te'tótirna te'tóto'nc te'tótuwa te'tótalbwë'
Future Perfect Continuous te'tóta'c te'tóte'lvi te'tótis te'tótos' te'tótulcnë' te'tótalve'le
Reflexive te'tóta'v te'tóte'v te'tótiv te'tóto'v te'tótuv te'tótav
A note about the subjuntive, since the verbs require a prefix and a suffix, the letter(s) before the ellipses are the prefix, the letters after are the suffix.
Subjunctive Mood - Imperative
ete'tóta'vn a'te'tótufbe' ete'tótowa a'te'tóto'bros
Subjunctive Mood - Conditional
Present ile'te'tóte'blnë' esa'te'tóta'vn ima'te'tótufbe' a'lna'te'tótiha' ifate'tótowa note'tóto'bros
Past ila'te'tóte'lcab esote'tóta's'no ime'te'tótush'ne' alne'te'tótilfnë' ife'te'tótosmnë' ne'te'tóto'fne'
Future ilite'tót.e'fni ese'te'tóta'sfnë' imote'tóturso alnite'tótliccni ig'ate'tótogwa nate'tóto's'a
Subjunctive Mood - Hopes/Wishes/Desires
Present Simple obe'te'tóte'cce' o'lcca'te'tóta'vn aste'te'tótufbe' ers'ite'tótibni irate'tótowa snote'tóto'bros
Present Continuos obote'tót.e'fno o'lccate'tót.a'vola astate'tótursa ersa'te'tót.ibfrä' ira'te'tót'bri sná'te'tótsh'na'
Past Simple obate'tóte'clab o'lccote'tóta'sno asté'te'tótush'ne' erse'te'tótilfnë' irete'tótosmnë' sne'te'tóto'fne'
Past Imperfect oba'te'tóte'fmnä' o'lccé'te'tót.a'ccsnë' asta'te'tótulcnä' ersate'tóticca irote'tótoccno sna'te'tóto'rsnä'
Past Continuos obute'tóte'lvu olcco'te'tóta'lno' asto'te'tótuso' ersote'tót.ijilo iro'te'tótoslo' sno'te'tót.o'fmo'
Future Simple obite'tóte'fni o'lcce'te'tóta'sfnë' astote'tóturso ers'íte'tóticcni iráte'tótogwa snate'tóto's'a
Future Continuos obo'te'tóte'lfo' olccite'tóta'sni astite'tótufri erso'te'tótifno' irite'tótog'i snute'tóto'snu
Reflexive obete'tóte'ge olccá'te'tótafpnä' astute'tótush'nu ersute'tótish'nu irute'tótimpu sníte'tótofri
Descriptive Mood (See use below). There are no Irregular Verbs in the Descriptive Mood
Descriptive Mood of all Verbs. Verb Nó'ret (to be) is the example
Present nó'ras nó'resne' nó'rimpa nó'rostnë' nó'rustin nó're'stnë'
Past Simple nó'raccne' nó'recc nó'rivne nó'rovca' nó'rufbnë' nó're'flo
Past Imperfect no'rarcnë' nó'rerni nó'rch'a nó'rontlë' nó'rub'e' nó're'tpi
Future nó'rash'ni nó'reste' nó'riccno nó'ronci nó'rufna' nó're'sclë'
  • Note that unlike in English the progressive/continuous tense in Molivianic does not require a form of the verb to be
    • Reflexive verbs also require a pronoun, which is discussed in a later secion
Irregular Verbs
nó'ret b'ech'et páwet
Indictaive - Active nó'r --> nos' b'ech' --> ba'f páw --> pest
Indicative - Passive nó'r --> nist b'ech' --> b'ac páw --> pist
Subjunctive - Imperative, Irregular Verbs change affixes and stems
Subjunctive Imperative inire'v ibiche'v ipife'v
Subjunctive - Conditional nó'r --> ne'v b'ech'--> bolf páw--> polt
Subjunctive - Hopes nó'r--> niv b'ech'--> bimf páw --> pimf

The descriptive mood is an extra mood in Molivianic, and serves a distinct purpose, that is to desribe an object. Here is one describing means. You use the descriptive to describe the attributes of an object, i.e. The stool is tall. The car is red. It is also used to describe temperature, (It is hot outside, The food is hot), and time (500 years ago, It is currently 5:00 clock). You do not use it to describe emotions, or the state of something that doesn't have to to with temperature. The boy is tired would not fall under the descriptive mood.

Comparisons, use the indicative mood. 

One slight note, any verb that doesn't start with a consonant is irregular in the subjunctive mood.

In the subjunctive tense, the prefixes listed are equivalent to saying "I wish/hope/desire." To change the prefixes to say things like "You wish/hope/desire, " refer to the following table. Change the first letter of the prefix to the letter in the table. Note how they all have accents

Prefixes in the Subjunctive
1st 2nd 3rd
Singular No change é' á'
Plural í' ó' á

Nouns, Pronouns and Noun DeclensionsEdit

Noun ConstructionEdit

Nouns are split up into thre "classes." The magical, natural and artificial classes. Each of these classes has a special root that each word in the class.

Noun Roots
Magical Natural Artificial
e'smo ilsnë' ufpo'

Nouns are then build in the following way

Noun Construction
First Letter (any consonant) Noun Class Root Modifier(s)

Modifiers are used to specify the noun. They are the differene between a man and a cat. They both are in the natural class, so the root is the same. Thus, modifiers are used to differenitate the nouns. 

Human, non declined, is nilsnë'poti. ilsnë' is the root, and poti is the modifier

Cat, non declined, is silsnë'posmi. ilsnë' is the root, and posmi is the modifier. 

The roots without a modifier also have a meaning.

me'smo is magic, non declined.

pilsnë' is nature, non declined.

pufpo'  is house, non declined.

Noun DeclensionEdit

In Molivianic, nouns decline according to gender, number, case in that order.

The following tables show the noun declensions. The artifical class only has one gender, similar to the neuter gender in several other languages. Noun definitions are derived the articles placed before the noun.

Noun Declension - Gender
Male Female
Natural noste' niste'
Magical sofna sifna
Artificial sh're'ni
Noun Declension - Number
Single Plural
Natural tflë' tflä'
Magical nifte' nifle'
Single sresi sriste'

Nouns decline in 8 main cases, the declensions for which are listed below.

Noun Declension - Case

Magical Natural Artifical
Nominative mrist pine' plost
Accusative migstë' pre'f pimvit
Dative me'cc puvn po'fn
Ablative milc pe'lvs paisj'
Genitive mríst pa'fn pifn
Vocative mo'sh'n pe'cc peg'
Locative mrnë't posh't pirg
Instrumental monrít pá'fn pstä'm

An example of a fully declined noun is: nilsnë'potinoste'tflë'pine'. nilsnë'poti is the noun before declension, noste' indicates that it is a male, tflë indicates there is only one, and pine indicates that it is the subject of the verb.

A few nouns in Molivianic decline irregularly. These are the nouns that do not have a modifier: me'smo, pilsne', and pufpo'.

The following tables show the declensions for those words. 

Irregular Noun Declension - Number
Singular Plural
me'smo ste' ro'
pilsnë' fle' j'wa'
pufpo' flnë' stu
Irregular Noun Declension - Gender
Masculine Feminine
me'smo nom scim
pilsnë' fin vne'n
pufpo' ccuf

Below is the table for the irregular noun declensions - case.

Irregular Noun Declension - Case
me'smo pilsnë' pufpo'
Nominative est o'st e's
Accusative iln a'sn e's'n
Dative uccn ist aist
Ablative o'fn ofn is
Genitive e'm o'fn iwa
Vocative e'g' ish' o'g'
Locative ufg o'j' e'sn
Instrumental a'sn e'lc óst

In Molivianic words tend to be very long. 

Pronouns and DeclensionsEdit

Pronouns
1st 2nd 3rd
Singular sloti mle'ti fleti
Plural slóti mlé'ti fléti

Pronoun declensions follow this rule: Take the first to letters of the corresponding noun declension in the natural class If they are both consonants, add an e' to the end. 

If want to say "Man does it," it becomes "nilsnë'potinoste'tflë'pine' fletinotfe'pre'te'tóta'pém."

The declensions for fletinotfe'pre'. fleti is the root, no marks masculinity (no is the first part of noste), tfe' marks that it is singular, and pre' marks the case (pre' is the first part of pre'f)

The first to letters keep the pronunciation of the first two letters in the original noun declension. For example, pi is pronounced /pai/ as opposed to /pI/, because pine' is /pain/. Direct object pronouns (accusative case) are attatched to the front of the verb, indirect object pronouns (dative case) are attatched to end of the verb

Reflexive pronouns are used when the object and subject are the same. Reflexive pronouns agree in number and person, but not in case or gender, with the subject of the sentence. Reflexive pronouns are attatched to the end of the verb. 

Reflexive Pronouns.
1st 2nd 3rd
Singular me's fe's sle's
Plural nle'm cle'm cce'm

Molivianic is pro-drop, in the 1st and 2nd person. It is not in the third.

Declensions can be abbreviated by only using the first two letters of each declension. Proper nouns (titles, places, people, etc) do not need to be declined. 

Proper NounsEdit

Proper nouns decline using only case in Molivianic. All Proper nouns, except for names of living things, are part of the artifical class. To decline a proper noun, you add the declension for case before the noun. For example, if I want to say Jack is yellow, Jack in this case is the subject so it becomes: 

Pine' Jack nó'rimpa le'sisni. 

Jack [nom] is [desc] [3rd] [pres.] yellow [masculine] [singular].

Jack is the subject, so the nominative case must be added to Jack. Another example, I am giving it to Jack.

Fletinotfe'pre'sle'numn puvn Jack. 

Lit: It [masc] [sing] [acc] I am giving [indic] [1st] [pres. cont.] to Jack [dat].

I am giving it to Jack.

Adjectives and AdverbsEdit

ArticlesEdit

Nouns do not decline according to definitness, and instead use articles to do so instead. Articles agree with nounds in number and gender, but do not agree in class, unless they are in the Artifical class. Neuter is used for nouns in the Aritifical class.

Articles
Masucline Feminine Neuter
Singular Plural Singular Plural Singular Plural
Definite sne'n sna'n fle'n fla'n vne' vne'n
Indefinite po'n pin sh'o'n sh'in ccno' ccno'n

A complete sentence in Molivianic would look something like this

"sne'n nilsnë'potinoste'tflë'pine' fletinofte'pre'aste'te'tótufbe'."

"abr. sne'n nilsnë'potinotfe'pi fleitnofe'pre'aste'te'tótufbe'."

Lit. The man hopes does it. 

Imp. The man hopes he does it.

The man [masc] [sing] [nom] it [masc] [sing] [acc] do [subj-hope] [3rd] [pres sim]

Other adjectives agree with nouns in number and gender, but do not have to agree with nouns in case or class. The table of adjective declensions is listed below. The example is le'si, or yellow.

Adjective Declensions
Masculine Feminine Neuter
Singular le'sisni le'sifli le'sipi
Plural le'sisit le'siflit

le'sipit

Adverbs agree in number and person with the verb. Below is the declension table. The example is raise', or quick

Adverb Declensions
1st 2nd 3rd
Singular raise'no raise'fle' rasie's'ar
Plural raise'nost raise'fle'st rasie's'arst

Adjectives come after the nouns the modify, while adverbs come before the verb they modify.

sne'n 'nilsnë'potinoste'tflë'pine'  le'sisni rasie's'ar fletinopre'te'tóta'pem

Lit: The man yellow quickly it did.

Imp: The yellow man did it quickly. 

There are no irregular adjective or adverb declensions. 

DemonstrativesEdit

Demonstrative Adjectives
This e'li
That e'si
That e'fai
That e'fi

Molivianic has 3 words for "that."

Demonstrative Uses
e'li When the speaker can touch the object they are referring to. 
e'si This is used when refering to things that the speaker can not reach, but the person they are speaking to can. 
e'fai This is used when neither the speaker, nor the person they are speaking to can reach, but the speaker can see the object
e'fi This is used when the speaker can't see the object they are referring to.

Demonstrative adjectives agree in number and gender with the noun they are referring.

"E'lipit pufpo'stuccufe's"

"These houses."

ComparativesEdit

Comparitives are slightly different from their English counterparts. Instead of using things like "more than," or "less than," Molivianic adds a suffix to adjectives instead. Adjectives must first decline in number and gender, then the suffix is added after the declension. While there are many different suffixes for many different comparisons, the for most common are listed below.

Adjective/Adverb Suffixes - Comparatives
More than (more beautiful) le'
Less than (less beautiful) lo
A lot more than (a lot more beautiful) le
A lot less than (a lot less beautiful) la'

When using a comparative, the normal word order is flipped. The adjective goes before the noun. The noun that is being compared is declined in the dative case.

This house is more yellow than that house

"E'lipi 'pufpo'flnë'ccufe's no'sa'pém le'sipile' pufpo'flnë'ccufaist.

This [neut] [sing] house [neut] [sing] [nom] is [ind] [3rd] [pres. simp.] more yellow than [more than] [neut] [sing] house [neut] [sing] [dat].

SuperlativesEdit

Superlatives follow the exact same structure as comparatives, the only difference is the suffixes on the adjectives.

Adjective/Adverb
Most  let
Least lat'

Gerunds, Participles, and Other extra Parts of SpeechEdit

Because Molivianic does not use a participle + form of to be to express the continous form of a verb, forming a gerund in Molivianic is different than forming a gerund in English. The gerund form changes according to case. Forming a gerund is slightly different in that infinitive part of a verb, et does not drop off, but is instead used to form the gerund. The example is re'ne'set, to read. Gerunds are not put into a class. Note the stem change in the passive voice. This occurs in all gerunds. et --> ot. 

Gerund Formation
Active Voice - Present
re'ne'set
Nominative re'ne'setne'
Accusative re'ne'setof
Dative re'ne'setif
Ablative re'ne'setno
Genetive re'ne'setfli
Vocative re'ne'setol
Locative re'ne'setil
Instrumental re'ne'setgle'
Active Voice - Perfect
Nominative re'ne'setic
Accusative re'ne'sete'cc
Dative re'ne'seta'c
Ablative re'ne'sete'lf
Genetive re'ne'setô'
Voactive re'ne'setnfë'
Locative re'ne'setop
Instrumental re'ne'setup
Passive Voice - Present (et --> ot)
Nominative re'ne'sotof
Accusative re'ne'sote'l
Dative re'ne'sota'lp
Ablative re'ne'sotilf
Genetive re'ne'sote'f
Vocative re'ne'sote'v
Locative re'ne'soto'v
Instrumental re'ne'sotup
Passive Voice - Perfect (et --> ot)
Nominative re'ne'sotno'p
Accusative re'ne'sote'lp
Dative re'ne'stoine'
Ablative re'ne'sotílf
Genetive re'ne'sotfo
Vocative re'ne'sotfilt
Locative re'ne'sote'f

Irregular gerunds: While most gerunds in Molivianic are regular, a few are not, most notable me'let, to eat.

In the Active voice, me'let --> mo'set

In the Passive voice, me'let --> mo'sot.

To form a participle, do the following steps. 

Take the verb, and conjugate in the approprate tense. Keep only the first two leters of the conjugation, then add ti to the end of the word. You can then decline it in the sentence as needed. 

Past Participle of re'ne'set: re'ne'set --> re'ne'súcola --> re'ne'súcti. 

NumbersEdit

Numbers in Molivanic are formed almost in the same way in Molivianic, the only difference is the actual names of the numbers.

Numbers in Molivianic 0 - 9
0 e'l
1 e'la'
2 e'la
3 e'lé'
4 e'le'
5 e'lo
6 e'l'ai
7 e'lo'
8 e'lu
9 el'a

These are the basic digits in Molivianic. The powers of ten up 10 10^9 are list below.

Powers of Ten
Ten o'la
Hundred o'lo
Thousand o'la'
Million o'le
Billion o'le'

10,423 = O'la Ola' E'le' O'lo E'la O'la E'lé'.

To express numbes bigger than 999,999,999,999, you start combining smaller powers of ten.

For example, ten trillion could be represented as

O'la O'le O'le (10 million million)

It could also be represented as

O'la O'la Ol'e (10 thousand billion)

To write a number, say 10,423, expand the number out, then right out the individual parts. To read a number, simply condense the parts.

Phrases, Sentences, and Tying it all togetherEdit

Molivianic, in the most common cases, is SVO.

Po'n nilsnë'potinoste'tflë'pine' amfa'mve' po'n de'smodsofnanifte'migstë'.

The man used to love the dragon.

However, in the passive voice, it becomes OVS

Po'n de'smodsofnanifte'migstë' amfilvnë' po'n nilsnë'potinoste'tflë'pine'

The dragon was loved by the man.

Vocabulary Edit


No. English Molivianic
1Isloti
2you (singular)mle'ti
3hefleti
4weslóti
5you (plural)mlé'ti
6theyfléti
7thise'li
8thate'si / e'fai / e'fi
9hereContionary_Wiki
10thereContionary_Wiki
11whoContionary_Wiki
12whatContionary_Wiki
13whereContionary_Wiki
14whenContionary_Wiki
15howContionary_Wiki
16notContionary_Wiki
17allContionary_Wiki
18manyContionary_Wiki
19someContionary_Wiki
20fewContionary_Wiki
21otherContionary_Wiki
22onee'la'
23twoe'la
24threee'lé'
25foure'le'
26fivee'lo
27bigContionary_Wiki
28longContionary_Wiki
29wideContionary_Wiki
30thickContionary_Wiki
31heavyContionary_Wiki
32smallContionary_Wiki
33shortContionary_Wiki
34narrowContionary_Wiki
35thinContionary_Wiki
36womannilsnë'potiniste'tflë'
37man (adult male)nilsnë'potinoste'tflë'
38man (human being)Contionary_Wiki
39childContionary_Wiki
40wifeContionary_Wiki
41husbandContionary_Wiki
42motherContionary_Wiki
43fatherContionary_Wiki
44animalContionary_Wiki
45fishContionary_Wiki
46birdContionary_Wiki
47dogContionary_Wiki
48louseContionary_Wiki
49snakeContionary_Wiki
50wormContionary_Wiki
51treeContionary_Wiki
52forestContionary_Wiki
53stickContionary_Wiki
54fruitContionary_Wiki
55seedContionary_Wiki
56leafContionary_Wiki
57rootContionary_Wiki
58barkContionary_Wiki
59flowerContionary_Wiki
60grassContionary_Wiki
61ropeContionary_Wiki
62skinContionary_Wiki
63meatContionary_Wiki
64bloodContionary_Wiki
65boneContionary_Wiki
66fatContionary_Wiki
67eggContionary_Wiki
68hornContionary_Wiki
69tailContionary_Wiki
70featherContionary_Wiki
71hairContionary_Wiki
72headContionary_Wiki
73earContionary_Wiki
74eyeContionary_Wiki
75noseContionary_Wiki
76mouthContionary_Wiki
77toothContionary_Wiki
78tongueContionary_Wiki
79fingernailContionary_Wiki
80footContionary_Wiki
81legContionary_Wiki
82kneeContionary_Wiki
83handContionary_Wiki
84wingContionary_Wiki
85bellyContionary_Wiki
86gutsContionary_Wiki
87neckContionary_Wiki
88backContionary_Wiki
89breastContionary_Wiki
90heartContionary_Wiki
91liverContionary_Wiki
92drinkContionary_Wiki
93eatContionary_Wiki
94biteContionary_Wiki
95suckContionary_Wiki
96spitContionary_Wiki
97vomitContionary_Wiki
98blowContionary_Wiki
99breatheContionary_Wiki
100laughContionary_Wiki
101seeContionary_Wiki
102hearContionary_Wiki
103knowContionary_Wiki
104thinkContionary_Wiki
105smellContionary_Wiki
106fearContionary_Wiki
107sleepContionary_Wiki
108liveContionary_Wiki
109dieContionary_Wiki
110killContionary_Wiki
111fightContionary_Wiki
112huntContionary_Wiki
113hitContionary_Wiki
114cutContionary_Wiki
115splitContionary_Wiki
116stabContionary_Wiki
117scratchContionary_Wiki
118digContionary_Wiki
119swimContionary_Wiki
120flyContionary_Wiki
121walkContionary_Wiki
122comeContionary_Wiki
123lieContionary_Wiki
124sitContionary_Wiki
125standContionary_Wiki
126turnContionary_Wiki
127fallContionary_Wiki
128giveContionary_Wiki
129holdContionary_Wiki
130squeezeContionary_Wiki
131rubContionary_Wiki
132washContionary_Wiki
133wipeContionary_Wiki
134pullContionary_Wiki
135pushContionary_Wiki
136throwContionary_Wiki
137tieContionary_Wiki
138sewContionary_Wiki
139countContionary_Wiki
140sayContionary_Wiki
141singContionary_Wiki
142playContionary_Wiki
143floatContionary_Wiki
144flowContionary_Wiki
145freezeContionary_Wiki
146swellContionary_Wiki
147sunContionary_Wiki
148moonContionary_Wiki
149starContionary_Wiki
150waterContionary_Wiki
151rainContionary_Wiki
152riverContionary_Wiki
153lakeContionary_Wiki
154seaContionary_Wiki
155saltContionary_Wiki
156stoneContionary_Wiki
157sandContionary_Wiki
158dustContionary_Wiki
159earthContionary_Wiki
160cloudContionary_Wiki
161fogContionary_Wiki
162skyContionary_Wiki
163windContionary_Wiki
164snowContionary_Wiki
165iceContionary_Wiki
166smokeContionary_Wiki
167fireContionary_Wiki
168ashContionary_Wiki
169burnContionary_Wiki
170roadContionary_Wiki
171mountainContionary_Wiki
172redContionary_Wiki
173greenContionary_Wiki
174yellowContionary_Wiki
175whiteContionary_Wiki
176blackContionary_Wiki
177nightContionary_Wiki
178dayContionary_Wiki
179yearContionary_Wiki
180warmContionary_Wiki
181coldContionary_Wiki
182fullContionary_Wiki
183newContionary_Wiki
184oldContionary_Wiki
185goodContionary_Wiki
186badContionary_Wiki
187rottenContionary_Wiki
188dirtyContionary_Wiki
189straightContionary_Wiki
190roundContionary_Wiki
191sharpContionary_Wiki
192dullContionary_Wiki
193smoothContionary_Wiki
194wetContionary_Wiki
195dryContionary_Wiki
196correctContionary_Wiki
197nearContionary_Wiki
198farContionary_Wiki
199rightContionary_Wiki
200leftContionary_Wiki
201atContionary_Wiki
202inContionary_Wiki
203withContionary_Wiki
204andContionary_Wiki
205ifContionary_Wiki
206becauseContionary_Wiki
207nameContionary_Wiki


Example textEdit

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki