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Progress 97%
Natraden
Nataden Natrædanzeres
Type
Fusional
Alignment
Ergative-Absolutive
Head direction
Initial (?)
Tonal
No
Declensions
Yes
Conjugations
Yes
Genders
3
Nouns decline according to...
Case Number
Definiteness Gender
Verbs conjugate according to...
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect


Natraden is an fusional, engineered language that I somewhat developed when bored one night and it grew from there. Though others may not agree, I'm quite satisfied with the way it turned out. You could say this language is semi-germanic. The flag below is me trying to design one in 5 minutes; and another I actually thought about. I have tried to put a lot of logic into the grammar as well as deriving words from other languages. I only intend to use it by myself though am more than happy to share it. Enjoy!

Archaic Natraden

Nataden

Old Flag

Natraden

New Flag

Welcome!Edit

Etxëlōdiw! Iw sæte dat Uj ggiwzi forwāte. Equilibrioj Lerk gehapten obrigo.

Welcome! I see that you continued. Anyway, have fun learning!

Welcome! I see that you went forward. Fun learning have anyway.

Alphabet and PhoneticsEdit

This is where the nightmare begins. Along with the full english alphabet, Natraden contains 20 other characters. Some will make sense, others not so much. Aspiration does not matter unless specified. The two letters in the table are not part of the alphabet and neither is ß, but all are used.

Natraden Letter IPA Representative Alphabet Name

A

a

A

Ā

A lz Makron

Æ

e

A lz Dier

Å

ɔ

A lz Reń
ÅE ɔj

B

b

Be
bɑ̃

C

s

Ce

Č

TX

t͡ʃ

Ce lz Haček

CH ç

D

d

De

Ď

ð

De lz Haček
DZ d͡z

E

ɛ

E

Ē

ɛː

E lz Makron

É

ĕ

E lz Akūt

Ë

ɵ

E lz Dier
ɛ̃

F

f

Fe

G

g

Ge

GG

d͡ʒ

H

h

He

HL

ʟ

I

i

I

Ī

I lz Makron

J

j

Je

K

k

Ke
KH

L

l

Le

LL/JJ

ʝ

LR

l͡ɹ

M

m

Me

N

n

Ne

Ń

ŋ

Ne lz Akūt

И

ɲ

Eиe
ИJ ɲˌ

O

ɒ

O

Ō

OU

ɒː

O lz Makron

Œ

ø

O lz Dier

P

p

Pe

PF/PW

pf

Q

k

Que

QU

kw

R

ɾ

Re

Ř

r

Re lz Haček
Я ʁ Eяe
ŘŃ rɑ̃

S

z

Se

Š

XH

ʃ

Se lz Haček

ŠŃ

ʃɑ̃

T

t

Te

U

u

U

Ū

U lz Makron

V

v

Ve

W

v

Vedūzime

X

ks

Exe

Y

ʌ or y

Ÿy

Ÿ

w

Ÿy lz Dier

Z

t͡s

Ze

Ž

ʒ

Ze lz Haček

Ź

θ

Ze lz Akūt

Phonetic RulesEdit

  • When a W terminates a word, it makes the IPA sound f
    • ​Anaglipw (Anaglyph) /anaglipf/
    • This doesn't apply to some words
      • Iwen (We) /ifɛn/
      • If the root word ends in w
        • ​Anaglipwor (Anaglyphs) /anaglipfɒw/
  • ​When R proceeds an unaccented vowel in the same syllable, it makes the IPA sound w
    • ​Ar (She) /aw/
    • Irregularities Happen:
      • Wur (Who) /v/
      • Ÿåor (Doors) /wɔw/
    • Ińlandere (English) /iŋlandɛɾɛ/    <-- Wrong
  • When Y proceeds a vowel, weird things can happen:
    • AY /ɛä/
    • EY /ɛä/
    • IY /iä/
    • OY /wä/
    • UY /uä/
    • YY /iä/
  • S makes an /s/ sound when at the end of a root word
  • Æ makes an /ɛ/ sound when in the first syllable
  • Ī becomes ii at the end of a word.
    • Energii (Energy)
      • Energīj (Energy-ACC) 
  • J creates a /ä/ sound when preceded by any form of i in the same syllable.
    • Also applies to Ys pronounced according to English
  • SS makes an elongated, almost stressed /s/ sound.
    • ß is not in the alphabet but exists. It makes the same sound as above.
  • Я makes the sound /ɐ̯/ when a vowel proceeds it.
    • The letter also cannot go at the end of a word
  • Ÿ makes the sound /ʏ/ when between two consonants.
  • LL and JJ make the sound /ç/ at the end of a word
  • An imaginary /ɵ̆/ comes between consonants that don't sound well together:
    • ​Partikl /pawtikɵ̆l/
    • This doesn't occur if it isn't needed, however:
      • Partiklor /pawtiklɒw/
  • When an voiced consonant is follow by its unvoiced counterpart, the unvoiced is said:
    • Bpik Brick /pik/

English PronunciationsEdit

These pronounciations get broken when inflections happen. Take the word Baby in Natraden. It is pronounced according to English:

Represents English Pronunciation

Baby (Uninflected)

Babor (Pluralised)

Babyj (Accusative)

Babyk (Dative)

Babys (Genetive)

Case MarkingEdit

Word order in Natraden is Subject-Object-Verb. Therefore, we need a way to distinguish between the subject and object, especially in sitations where there is only the object (passive verbs).

There are 6 cases in Natraden. Nominative, Accusative, Dative, Genetive, Vocative and Instrumental.

In this example, we will be using the word for World: Planeta.

Case

Suffix Natraden Sentence English Translation

Nominative (NOM)

Nomnus

- Zegle Planeta sorvīvi. The world survived.

Accusative (ACC)

Aktus

-j Zegle Planetaj geprazen! Praise the world!

Dative (DAT)

Datus

-k Iw zegle Planetak cpeki I said [to] the world.

Genetive (GEN)

Genetus

-s Cpinflūgl zegle Planetas. The world's dirt.

Vocative (VOC)

Voktus

-w Jwlo, Planetaw! Hello, world!

Instrumental (INS)

Toltus

-y Energīj zegle Planetay genimmen Gain energy [using] the world

External MarkingEdit

Any Quotations or anything of the such also have to be marked. This is done differently. The quotation (in quotation marks) is proceeded by the corresponding marker. The marker, however, acts like a particle and as it is a single letter, is pronounced like it would in the alphabet (sound + e for consonants, just the sound for vowels)

Er "Uj hor beokte?"cpeki.

He said "How are you?"

This also applies to anything taken and pronounced exactly like English:

Post-Processingpermite.

Allows Post-Processing.

J in the above examples are pronounced /jɛ/

Word OrderEdit

SOV is just a summarisation of the entire word order. Any nouns basically come before the verb unless the noun is preceded by a preposition. The entire worder is as follows, anything in square brackets are optional:

  1. Subject
  2. Object
  3. Indirect Object
  4. Instrument
  5. [Auxiliary] Verb
  6. Adverb
  7. Preposition [+ Indirect Object]
  8. Time
  9. Seperable Part of Seperable Verb
  10. Participle
  11. Infinitive (if Auxiliary verb is used)

Verb ConjugationEdit

Verbs conjugate like in most european langauges, and also unlike other languages, every verb is regular (excluding the structural form of to be and to have, which derive from germanic). All verbs end in llé and are required to be replaced in order to conjuagte. If the mood of the verb is changed, llé is replaced with en (doesn't apply to interrogative; normal conjugation occurs) and the corresponding prefix is added. To make a verb negative, you add the suffix -nz after conjugating (okte => oktenz). Please note participles go at the end of a sentence. C stands for normal conjugation,

To BeEdit

There are two forms of to be, normally referred to as the Auxiliary Form and the Structural Form. The first one is self explanatory, the Auxiliary form is always regular and is only used to form the progressive tense, alongside the participle. The Structural form is used in proper sentence structuring (hence the name) such as He is some guy.

Structural Conjugation of the word oktllé (to be) is below, irregularities underlined:

Tense + Mood

Conjugated Form or

Verb in its place

Participle if Necessary

Infinitive

oktllé

Imperative

gebinden

Subjunctive

obisten

Interrogative

beC

Present Participle

ere

Past Participle

bet

Gerund

berend

Present Simple

okte

Present Progressive

okte

ere

Present Perfect

håre

bet

Present Perfect Progressive

oktihåre

ere

Past Simple

omni

Past Progressive

okti

ere

Past Perfect

håri

bet

Past Perfect Progressive

oktihåri

ere

Simple Future

wyt

Simple Conditional

worbunden

Future Progressive

oktyt

ere

Conditional Progessive

worokten

ere

Future Perfect

håryt

bet

Conditional Perfect

worhåren

bet

Future Perfect Progressive

oktihåryt

ere

Conditional Perfect Progressive

woroktihåren

ere

To HaveEdit

To Have has two forms, the same as to be (refer to the above). The only difference is that the Auxiliary form is used with the perfect tense, rather than the progressive.

Structural Conjugation of the word hårllé (to have) is below, irregularities underlined:

Tense + Mood

Conjugated Form or

Verb in its place

Participle if Necessary

Infinitive

hårllé

Imperative

gehapten

Subjunctive

obhæten

Interrogative

beC

Present Participle

habëndere

Past Participle

gehaptet

Gerund

håb

Present Simple

habe

Present Progressive

okte

habëndere

Present Perfect

håre

gehaptet

Present Perfect Progressive

oktihåre

habëndere

Past Simple

hati

Past Progressive

okti

habëndere

Past Perfect

håri

gehaptet

Past Perfect Progressive

oktihåri

habëndere

Simple Future

hoyt

Simple Conditional

worheben

Future Progressive

oktyt

habëndere

Conditional Progessive

worokten

habëndere

Future Perfect

håryt

gehaptet

Conditional Perfect

worhåren

gehaptet

Future Perfect Progressive

oktihåryt

habëndere

Conditional Perfect Progressive

woroktihåren

habëndere

Normal VerbsEdit

Conjugation of the word cpekllé (to speak) is below:

Tense + Mood

Conjugated Form or

Verb in its place

Participle if Necessary
Infinitive cpekllé
Imperative gecpeken
Subjunctive obcpeken
Interrogative becpekC
Present Participle cpekere
Past Participle cpeket
Gerund cpek
Present Simple

cpeke

Present Progressive okte cpekere
Present Perfect håre cpeket
Present Perfect Progressive oktihåre cpekere
Past Simple cpeki
Past Progressive okti cpekere
Past Perfect håri cpeket
Past Perfect Progressive oktihåri cpekere
Simple Future cpekyt
Simple Conditional worcpeken
Future Progressive oktyt cpekere
Conditional Progessive worokten cpekere
Future Perfect håryt cpeket
Conditional Perfect worhåren cpeket
Future Perfect Progressive oktihåryt cpekere
Conditional Perfect Progressive woroktihåren cpekere

Seperable VerbEdit

Conjugation of the word etlādllé (to download) is below, note that the seperable parts always go at the end of the sentence (refer to word order):

Tense + Mood

Conjugated Form or

Verb in its place

Participle if Necessary
Infinitive etlādllé
Imperative gelāden et
Subjunctive oblāden et
Interrogative belādC et
Present Participle etlādere
Past Participle etlādet
Gerund etlād
Present Simple

lāde et

Present Progressive okte etlādere
Present Perfect håre etlādet
Present Perfect Progressive oktihåre etlādere
Past Simple lādet
Past Progressive okti etlādere
Past Perfect håri etlādet
Past Perfect Progressive oktihåri etlādere
Simple Future lādyt et
Simple Conditional worlāden et
Future Progressive oktyt etlādere
Conditional Progessive worokten etlādere
Future Perfect håryt etlādet
Conditional Perfect worhåren etlādet
Future Perfect Progressive oktihåryt etlādere
Conditional Perfect Progressive woroktihåren etlādere

Verb with a 'Prefix'Edit

Verbs with a prefix always appear with a hyphen. Anything before the hyphen is pronounced according to the alphabet. The following example will conjugate r-dectīnllé (copy; recreate)

Tense + Mood

Conjugated Form or

Verb in its place

Participle if Necessary

Infinitive

r-dectīnllé

Imperative

r-gedectīnen

Subjunctive

r-obdectīnen

Interrogative

r-bedectīnC

Present Participle

r-dectīnere

Past Participle

r-dectīnet

Gerund

r-dectīn

Present Simple

r-dectīne

Present Progressive

okte

r-dectīnere

Present Perfect

håre

r-dectīnet

Present Perfect Progressive

oktihåre

r-dectīnere

Past Simple

r-dectīni

Past Progressive

okti

r-dectīnere

Past Perfect

håri

r-dectīnet

Past Perfect Progressive

oktihåri

r-dectīnere

Simple Future

r-dectīnyt

Simple Conditional

r-wordectīnen

Future Progressive

oktyt

r-dectīnere

Conditional Progessive

worokten

r-dectīnere

Future Perfect

håryt

r-dectīnet

Conditional Perfect

worhåren

r-dectīnet

Future Perfect Progressive

oktihåryt

r-dectīnere

Conditional Perfect Progressive

woroktihåren

r-dectīnere

NegativeEdit

Making a verb negative means adding nz directly after the verb. This means it goes before anything after the verb.

Iw ggiwzi nz erlere.

I didn't go earlier.

Auxiliary VerbsEdit

Negative auxiliary verbs often use nz as a suffix or use it to replace the last few letters.

Refer to Natraden Auxiliary Verbs

Imperative MoodEdit

The imperative mood is applicable to all persons. You would use the applicable pronoun in the nominative case however:

First Person SingularEdit

Often used when talking to yourself. Otherwise it isn't very common. At least it's a way to distinguish whether a person is talking to themselves or you, so there's that.

Iw geadepen et!

Come on! (When you're talking to yourself)

This sometimes can be used on buttons. For example, when you press a button Go! in the game, it can be written as Geggiwzen! or in less frequent situations, Iw geggiwzen!. This derives from the perspective that buttons in a game are telling a game to do something, though the button is part of the game itself; pressing the button will causes the game to tell itself to do something. This isn't as common without the pronoun but it can be used.

First Person PluralEdit

This is hard to express in English. It uses will with an emphasis. For example, compare the following:

Iwen ggiwzi erlerenz.

We will go later.

Iwen geggiwzen et 3 Lamafragmentor.

We will go on the count of three.

Normal future tense is very casual. Emphasise it and it's almost a command. Must can be substituted however.

Let us can also be substituted:

Let's go!

Second PersonEdit

This can't get any more obvious. The direct order to the person(s) you are speaking to.

Uj(en) Icj geetxaren!

Make it!

Third PersonEdit

This, like the first person plural, uses the translation will.

Er(en) geggiwzen wor Iw Er(en)j cpeke i ggiwzllé!

He/They will go when I tell him/them (to go)!

Other VoicesEdit

PassiveEdit

Passive in other languages use a completely different verb. In English we use the verb is; in German, werden. In Natraden, no verb changes are made. The only difference is the subject because the object.

Plajtolorj håri etlāden

Games were downloaded

Someone had downloaded games

ReflexiveEdit

The reflexive voice isn't very common though it still can be utilised. This makes use of pronouns of self:

  • Men - Myself
  • Vot - Yourself
  • Sich - His-/Her-/Itself
  • Nes - Ourselves
  • Voz - Yourselves
  • Les - Themselves
  • Ējn - Oneself

There is only ever the nominative and dative case used in this voice, apart from anything proceeding the verb of course:

Men Iwk sæti

I saw myself

The pronoun can be omitted however.

Voz bevoseиče?

What do you call yourselves?

ChangeEdit

Sometimes, the verb changes in the reflexive voice:

Uj geprazen! 

Praise!

Vot Ujk geprazen!

Bless you!

Some verbs are completely reflexive, however:

Men Iwk sæte et Æcplazk .

I am in a restaurant.

Auxiliary VerbsEdit

Auxliary verbs are the same as other languages, with some extras. Proper auxiliary verbs refer to all the auxiliary verbs exluding the normal verbs with auxiliary forms. All auxliliary verbs have an infinitive though only for lexicon reasons and don't serve a meaning in deep grammar. All proper auxiliary verbs can only be conjugated with either an e or nothing. Any non-present conjugations end in te. They also replace the main verb in a sentence leaving the the verb being replaced to move to the end.

Kanllé/MalléEdit

  • Expresses possibility and permission
  • Conjugation is kan/mae
    • English equivalent is can/may
    • Iw kan sætllé!
      • I can see!
  • Negative is kannz/manz
    • English equivalent is can't/might not
    • Iw Icj manz etxarllé.
      • I might not do it.
  • Non-present conjugation is kante/mate
    • English equivalent is could/might
    • Iw mate plajllé
      • I might play.

RequisilléEdit

  • Expresses obligation
  • Conjugation is requisie
    • English equivalent is must
    • Wz, Er requisie!
      • No, he must!
  • Negative is requisinz
    • English equivalent is mustn't
    • Er requisinz, ira zegle Gropwj Råems okte.
      • He musn't, or it's back to square one.
  • Non-present conjugation is requisite
    • English equivalent is must've
    • Ar Icj requisite extarllé!
      • She must've done it!

SoltlléEdit

  • Expresses imperativity and speculation
  • Conjugation is sole
    • English equivalent is shall
    • Uj sole ggiwzllé.
      • You shall go.
  • Negative is solnz
    • English equivalent is shan't
    • Ic solnz lamada etxarllé.
      • It shan't happen now.
  • Non-present conjugation is solte
    • English equivalent is should('ve)
    • Iw solte få Iceńk plajllé.
      • I should've played for them.

LorlléEdit

  • Expresses pleasure
  • Conjugation is lore
    • English equivalent is like to
    • Iw lore danzllé.
      • I like to dance.
  • Negative is lornz
    • English equivalent is don't like to
    • Iw lornz danzllé. (:P)
      • I don't like to dance,
  • Non-present conjugation is lorte
    • English equivalent is used to*
    • Iw Icj lorte lårllé.
      • ​I use to like it.
  • Though not showing pleasure, it is a way to display that you used to do something.

LamenlléEdit

  • Expresses the ability to do something on the basis that you aren't occupied
  • Conjugation is lamene
    • English equivalent is have time (for)
    • Jz, Iw lamene
      • ​Sure, I have time.
  • Negative is lamenz
    • ​English equivalent is don't have time (for)
    • Ar lamenz danzllé.
      • She doesn't have time to dance.
  • Non-present conjugation is lamente
    • ​English equivalent is did/will have time (for)
    • Pjēgō, Iw lamentenz hœt.
      • Sorry, I won't have time today.

ParticiplesEdit

As word order specifies, although participles are considered 'last' in a clause, the verb replaced by auxiliary verbs always goes to the end. Thus, when you use auxiliary verbs with continuous or perfect tense then it would look like this:

Iw mate gjalōrënen hårllé.

I might have died.

Personal PronounsEdit

Personal Pronouns follow ordinary case marking

Person '0th' Person

1st Person

2nd Person 3rd Person
Number - Sing. Plu. Sing. Plu. Sing. Plu.
Gender - - - - - Masculine Feminine Neutral Masculine Feminine Neutral
Pronoun Jw Iw Iwen Uj Ujen Er Ar Ic Eren Aren Icen

Noun PluralisationEdit

To make a noun plural, you use the suffix or. This can go directly after a word or it can replace several letters:

Noun Ending Plural Replacement Example
Normal Pluralisation Add Or

Partikl

Partiklor

-ii -īor

Entitii

Entitīor

-(Vowel) -or

Plajere

Plajeror

-eri -iror

Plajeri

Plajiror

-(Vowel)i -(Vowel)jor

Dai

Dajor

-åor

Ÿå

Ÿåor

AdjectivesEdit

Adjectives are always a suffix (they are pronounced seperately, however) to a noun and never agree. Inflexions must happen first, however. This becomes a problem in genetive case . Adjectives that derive directly from other languages are suffixed with a hyphen separating them:

Ōto-lower-end (Lower-end car)

Thanks to this, you can get simple phrases such as My father's big fast red car looking like a monstrocity that is:

Iwspotresōtořńlzřńpidalzgrōcec

Luckily enough, this word doesn't look like this if referred to on its own:

Iwspotresōtořń lz -řńpida lz -grōcec

Describing More than OnceEdit

Nouns can be described more than once but uses the word and. There are two ways of writing it; pronounced the same either way. The examples include Red stained glass:

Compact FormEdit

This form is used in a written sentence: I have some red stained glass:

Iw multē Panjverctreńilzrń habe.

Extended FormEdit

This form is used when only referring to the object itself[+1]: Red stained glass:

Panverctreńi lz -rń

[+1] This is literal and thus you cannot do things like this:

Bōdo ale Panverctreńi lz -rń

But instead you must write:

Bōdo ale Panverctreńilzrń

More than two adjectivesEdit

This still is applicable, though it mostly does not make sense if directly translated.

Big red stained glass:

Panverctreńi lz -rń lz -grōcec or Panverctreńilzrńlzgrōcec.

ComparativeEdit

Comparative adjectives are used for comparison. Here, every letter from the first vowel of the last syllable onward is ommited, the suffix ere replacing them:

Grōcec => Grōcere

Mitgæt => Mitgere

Super => Supere

SuperlativeEdit

This type of adjective is used in comparison though in more of an 'outruling' situation. The same omission rules apply here, though the suffix is erect:

Grōcec => Grōcerect

Mitgæt => Mitgerect

Super => Superect

Adjectival VerbsEdit

These adjectives derive from verbs. To make one, you get the past tense or present participle conjugation and add the prefix ver- This prefix is used when changing a root word's part of speech.

Zegle Cōziowoÿovergjalōrënere

The dying bird

However, if there is already a word instead of the adjectival verb, then that is used instead.

Zegle Cōziowoÿotåt

The dead bird

Some verbs change in adjectival form. For example:

Zen Ōtoveromni

Ōto means car and Veromni derives from Omni meaning was. Despite its origin, Veromni means possible. This possible is only used in past tense as it literally means would have been. Thus:

The possible car or The car that would have been.

'At'Edit

The word for at differs and is used in a prepositional sense and to show something is made of something else:

Zen Fræim alo Woяt

The frame made out of wood; The wooden frame

Here are the words for at:

At At the; Made out of At a (When necessary)
Masculine Am Ale A'ž
Feminine Am Ala A'hl
Neuter Am Alo Ā'm
Starts with a Vowel Am' Al' Ah'

Note: that the dative declension only applies to nouns after the prepositonal at. If the at displays the material in which the object is made out of, then the material does not decline to case. Also note that anything after these words become compact:

Woяt Orks + alo = al'Orkswoяt

Genetive CaseEdit

Two NounsEdit

To show something is possessed by another, it depends on how many are in the chain. If there are only two nouns, like in My Father, then the order is as follows:

Potre Iws [Father I-GEN]

Same rules still apply in different cases, accusative for example:

Potrej Iws [Father-ACC I-GEN]

More than Two NounsEdit

This is where problems occur, because certain restrictions have to take place. If there is more than two nouns, the nouns are stringed, like in My Father's Car:

Iwspotresōto [I-GEN-Father-GEN-Car]

Cases again still apply:

Iwspotresōtoj [I-GEN-Father-GEN-Car-ACC]

AdjectivesEdit

Since the words are stringed, none of the nouns before the last can be described. Only the last noun can have an adjective attached to it. My Father's red Car:

Iwspotresōtořń [I-GEN-Father-GEN-Car-Red]

It is because of this that the longest word is unknown.

Getting around this problemEdit

So the problem is that none of the preceding nouns can be described. Alternatively, one can use the 'of' form (see below). But this can only happen once. Refer to this *Minecraft* example:

Woяtsbōdor del Orkknoyr

Dark Oak Wooden Planks

[Wood-GEN-Planks of the Oak-DAT-Dark]

'Of'Edit

This uses words like 'of'. If the word for 'of' is used, one would use the dative case for the possessor.

Zåglr Adrec w Iwk (My Adress; The Adress of me)

There are different words for 'of'. It can be 'of the', 'of a', in all three genders.

For the three genders, we will use the examples:

Masculine: Howl possessed by Wolf

Feminine: Bird possessed by Sky

Neuter: Stream possessed by Data

Definite

[Of The]

Indefinite

[Of A]

(When necessary)

Zero

[Of]

Partitive

[Of Some; Plural]

Negative

[Of No]

Masculine

Hurlement du Loudrek

Hurlement é Loudrek

Hurlement w Loudrek

Hurlement Loudrork

Hurlement Loudrek

Feminine

Cōziowoÿo de Cōziok

Cōziowoÿo ā Cōziok

Cōziowoÿo w Cōziok

Cōziowoÿo di Cōziork

Cōziowoÿo Cōziok

Neuter

Ctrom del Dātak

Ctrom dela Dātak

Ctrom w Dātak

Ctrom da Dātork

Ctrom nela Dātak

Contraction

(Of Europe)

d'Errūpk N/A N/A N/A n'Errūpk

You can still use the format Hurlement Loudres however.

Word StructureEdit

Noun

-

[+GEN-

Noun]-

Number- Case- Adjective

GendersEdit

There are 3 genders in Natraden after the gender revamp. These are MasculineFeminine and Neuter. The genders are not biological in any sense. There are some rules to strictly determine which gender a noun belongs to:

  • Time is feminine
  • Human Beings and their Titles are masculine
    • Whether a woman or man, the gender is masculine.
  • Any noun with the suffix -nac is feminine
    • This overrides all the other rules
  • Any noun with the suffix -tol or -mekanik is neuter
    • This overrides all the other rules
  • Numbers and Measurements are feminine
  • Weather is neuter
  • Science is masculine
    • Science can be anything from the word Science itself and really long, hard to pronounce chemical names to the Periodic Table .
    • Biology: including body parts and human processes.
      • Nature: plants and forests etc.
    • Chemistry: chemicals, elements and so forth.
    • Physics: forces, types of energy and the universe.
  • Animals are masculine
    • Basically, if it's animate, isn't technology and isn't a human, it counts.
  • Technology is neuter
    • This includes vehicles
  • Loanwords are neuter
    • Whether they are spelled exactly the same or adapted to Natraden, this still applies.
    • This overrides all the other rules excluding the suffix rules; unless specified otherwise.
  • Clothing is masculine
  • Locations are feminine
    • This includes words like up and left.
    • This also includes words with the suffix -plaz.
  • Emotions are feminine
  • Food and Drink are masculine
  • Musical Instruments are neuter
  • Religion is feminine
    • This applies to everything affiliated with them; including their gods and their texts.
  • Gerunds are neuter
  • Colours are neuter

ArticlesEdit

There are four types of articles in Natraden, Definite, Indefinite, Partitive and Negative; each differenciating with gender:

Definite Indefinite Partitive Negative
Masculine zegle multē når
Feminine zåglr ihl multī nos
Neuter zen īm multx nen
English Approximate the a(n) some no

Note that the indefinite article is rarely used. It only used when you need to be specific. Compare these:

Iw nåre Maščulin

I need a man

Iw nåre iž Maščulin

I need one man

SupinesEdit

Supines are almost literal in Natraden. They are technically one phrase after another, this is almost the equivalent of saying that the first verb occurs for the second.

Uj bewåre dīses Lińkj i œffnllé?

Do you want to open this link?

[You Interrogative-want this link to open?]

Here the supine is open, which requires you to want it in order for it to happen.

ContractionsEdit

There are few contractions in Natraden:

I'gleEdit

Being a contracted form of i zegle, meaning to the in the masculine gender. The uncontracted form is still useable.

I'gle Cōziok!

To the skies!

I'kteEdit

I'kte is the contracted form of Iw okte (I am). Because of word order, it cannot use the accusative case*. This is only used in progressive tense. 

I'kte ggiwzere (I am going).

Using it in normal sentenceEdit

Though highly archaicI'kte could be used with the accusative form.

Ujj i'kte (I am thou)

Ih'Edit

Contracted form of Ihl (feminine 'a'). Used before words beginning with a vowel.

Ih'ordirnac (A difficulty)

Dete/Demni/DytEdit

This represents for There is or are/was/will be respectively. This is the contraction although the word order says otherwise; for this reason, the apostrophe is ignored, making it a word and thus does not follow word order in terms of the adverb.

VerbsEdit

The conjugation of the verb can be replaced with the apostrophe so long as the tense is specified. This is heavily informal.

Iw æc' erlere (I ate earlier)

Ar hår'nz hœt æcen (She hasn't eaten today)

InterrogationEdit

Interrogative VerbEdit

Simple VerbEdit

Very little is changed when asking a question. The word order is kept the same. The only noticeable differences are probably the interrogative words, change in pronoun and the question mark at the end.

When a question is asked, the verb changes to its interrogative mood: conjugated as normal with the prefix be-. We'll use the same example as above:

Uj bewåre dīses Lińkj i œffnllé?

Do you want to open this link?

If it wasn't a question, the verb would remain the same:

Uj wåre dīses Lińkj i œffnllé.

You want to open this link.

ParticiplesEdit

If a participle is used, normal procedures happen. Have you eaten?:

Uj behåre æcen?

The prefix is added to the verb to have, however.

Separable VerbsEdit

Again, normal conjugation applies. The prefix is added after the verb is separated: Did you download it?

Uj Icj belādi et?

Interrogative WordsEdit

It's words like these that can determine whether a sentence is interrogative or not, as they can't be used in an ordinary sentence.

  • Where
    • Wer
  • Where to
    • Weri
  • What
    • War
    • Nothing*
  • What for
    • Wåf
  • When
    • Wor
    • Warlam (What time)
  • Who
    • Wur
  • Why
    • Wir
  • How
    • Hor
  • How Much
    • Horиom

Each of these words can replace where the answer would go in the reply phrase. Warlam beokte? means, what time is it, or more literally, (it) is what time?. Uj wur beokte? means Who are you? or You are who?. The replying phrase would change the pronoun and replace the interrogative word with the answer. The respective answers for the preceding to questions are:

  • 12`30 okte
    • Warlam is replaced with the time
    • The verb is back to its normal conjugated form
  • Iw Bobj okte
    • The pronoun is changed from You to I
    • Wur is replaced with the name
    • The verb is restored to its conjugated form
  • Sometimes, if the question has 'what' in it, it can be omitted. Iwen Lektūrorj behabe? can either mean Do we have lessons? or What lesson do we have?. The second one would be the preferred meaning since the first definition is normally used with a point in time, like today.

Common PhrasesEdit

There can be more than one way to say the same type of phrase.

GreetingsEdit

So you have the typical HelloGood Morning etc. and some extras.

Natraden English Equivalent
Jwlo Hello (General)
Podze Hello (At the Door)
Djep Hello (On the phone)
Nwlo Goodbye
Krzwoloz Good Morning (6am-12pm)
Troktloz Good Afternoon (12pm-6pm)
Ostroktloz Good Evening (6pm-9pm)
Nītloz Good Night (Greeting; 9pm-6am)
Nītloz i Šlaftol Good Night (About to Sleep)
Dailoz Good Day; Have a nice day

Basic PhrasesEdit

Brackets hold extra information and square brackets hold literal meanings.

Natraden English Equivalent
Jz Yes
Jzloz Of course [Good Yes]
Wz No
No (Denying an Offer)
Nē prego No, thank you [No, please]
Prego Please
Iw ...j worlorego I would like ... please
Getzen Thank You [Imperative to thank]
Nos Probje You're Welcome [No problem]
Pjēgō Sorry; My Apologies
Lobolozwz Sorry (Bumping into Someone) [Bad Walking]
Vot geprazen Bless You [Praise yourself]
Men geondåren Sorry (Polite) [Forgive myself]
Jw "Hello"j becpeken (et Natrædanzere)* hor? How do you say "Hello" (in Natraden)? [Like what does one say "Hello" (in Natraden)?]
Jw "Hello"j becpeken * hor "Jwlo"k. You would say "Jwlo". [One says "Hello" like "Jwlo".]
"Jwlo"j cpeke "Jwlo" is said.

Numerical SystemEdit

The numbers in Natraden are decimal and therefore the highest digit is 9.

CardinalEdit

The numbers are normal until 10/12. Then on, the numbers are ordered. 95, for example, is written as: 

Five-w Ninety; the w derives from the word for of.

Numeral Natraden Abbreviation [+3]
0 Nillo
1 Onz
2 Dūs
3 Wzo
4 Kūaz
5 Penjw [+1]
6 Čizto
7 Ceptāre
8 Ašč
9 Nanarače
10 Data
11 Erlūd [+2]
12 Telver [+2]
13 Wzow Data
14 Kūazw Data
15 Penjw Data
16 Čiztow Data
17 Ceptārew Dara
18 Aščw Data
19 Nanaračew Data
20

Dūta

21 Onzw Dūta
30 Wzta
40 Kūta
50 Penta
60 Čizta
70 Cepta
80 Ašta
90 Nanta
100 Danti
101 Onzw Danti
110 Dataw Danti
111 Onzw Dataw Danti
200 Dūnti
300 Wzti
400 Kūnti
500 Penti
600 Čizti
700 Cepti
800 Ašti
900 Nanti
1,000 Dakilo 1k.
2,000 Dūkilo 2k.
3,000 Wzokilo 3k.
10,000 Datakilo 10k.
20,000 Dūtakilo 20k.
30,000 Wztakilo 30k.
100,000 Dantikilo 100k.
1 million Damilnac 1mia.
10 million Datamilnac 10mia.
100 million Dantimilnac 100mia.
1 billion Damiljard 1mir.
1 trillion Dabilnac 1bia.
1 quadrillion Dabiljard 1bir.
  • [+1] Contains two syllables which can be distinguished as [Pen-j'w] or [Pe-niw]. EIther is acceptable though the first is more preferred. Can also be written as Peиw to avoid confusion.
  • [+2] Can be written as Onzw Data and Dūsw Data respectively.
  • [+3] Only used with measurements:
    • 1mia. Luźjaror
      • 1m Lightyears
  • Abbreviations are taken seriously. There is a massive difference between 100k. and 100k. The dot specifically implies an abbreviation. Without a dot, it means 100 in the dative case. Thus the k is pronounced ke according to the alphabet. 
  • There are prefixes to show numbers of something: 1 thousand, 2 thousand etc. These prefixes are:
    • Nil- (Not often used in written numbers)
    • Da(n)-
    • Dū(n)-
    • Wz(o)-
    • Kū(n)-
    • Pen-
    • Čiz-
    • Cep-
    • Aš-
    • Nan-

Example Number: 3.687.121.698

Aščw Nantaw Čiztiw, Dakilow Dūtakilow Dantikilow, Cepmilnacw Aštamilnacw Čiztimilnacw, Wzobilnac.

(Above is the reason why random numbers should be abolished)

MarkingEdit

As you may see in other languages, there are special markings to help read large strings of numbers.

Digit GroupingEdit

In English we use a comma: 1,356. In Natraden, a dot is utilised: 1.356.

Decimal MarkEdit

Alot of languages either use a comma (,) or point (.). In Natraden we use `; called Flek.

1.356`123

Čiztow Pentaw Wztiw, Dakilo, Flek Onz Dūs Wzo.

OrdinalEdit

These numbers have two superscripted letters, all ending in e.

Numeral Natraden
0ᵀᴱ Nejte
1ᵀᴱ Fœte
2ᴿᴱ Ondre
3ᴻᴱ Trēиe
4ᴿᴱ Pfjēre
5ᵀᴱ Femte
6ᵀᴱ Šjete
7ᴾᴱ Cēpe
8ᴺᴱ Åpne
9ᴺᴱ Næine
10ᴺᴱ Djēne
11ᵂᴱ Elwe
12ᵀᴱ Tōte
13ᴺᴱ Trēиew Data
14ᴿᴱ Pfjērew Data
15ᵀᴱ Pemtew Data
16ᵀᴱ Šjetew Data
17ᴾᴱ Cēpew Data
18ᴺᴱ Åpnew Data
19ᴺᴱ Næinew Data
20ᴺᴱ

Dujēne

21ᵀᴱ Fœtew Dūta
30ᴺᴱ Wjēne
40ᴺᴱ Kjēne
50ᴺᴱ Pjēne
60ᴺᴱ Cjēne
70ᴺᴱ Šjēne
80ᴺᴱ Ojēne
90ᴺᴱ Njēne
100ᵀᴱ Dante
101ᵀᴱ Fœtew Danti
110ᴺᴱ Djēnew Danti
111ᵀᴱ Fœtew Dataw Danti
200ᵀᴱ Dūnte
300ᵀᴱ Wzte
400ᵀᴱ Kūnte
500ᵀᴱ Pente
600ᵀᴱ Čizte
700ᵀᴱ Cepte
800ᵀᴱ Ašte
900ᵀᴱ Nante
1,000ᵂᴱ Dakilwe
2,000ᵂᴱ Dūkilwe
3,000ᵂᴱ Wzokilwe
10,000ᵂᴱ Datakilwe
20,000ᵂᴱ Dūtakilwe
30,000ᵂᴱ Wztakilwe
100,000ᵂᴱ Dantikilwe
1,000,000ᴾᴱ Damilnacpe
10,000,000ᴾᴱ Datamilnacpe
100,000,000ᴾᴱ Dantimilnacpe
1,000,000,000ᴾᴱ Damiljardepe

Example Number: 3.687.121.698ᴺᴱ

Åptew* Nantaw Čiztiw, Dakilow Dūtakilow* Dantikilow, Cepmilnacw Aštamilnacw* Čiztimilnacw, Wzobilnac*

[+1] Note how only the number that is truly ordinal (the 8ᴷ in this example) is the only one that changes. Numbers like Dūtakilow have not changed to Dopkilow.

AdjectivalEdit

These are the only adjectives that are placed before the noun:

8ᴺᴱ Expronnac

Eighth Explosion

TuplesEdit

These are those numbers that show multiples.

English

Natraden

Single

Ciglē

Double

Dūzime

Triple

Treplissime
Quadruple Kuplissime
Quintuple Pelissime
Sextuple Helissime
Septuple Ceptīssime
Octuple Aktissime
Nonuple Nanissime
Decuple Datissime
Undecuple Erlissime
Duodecuple Telissime
Tredecuple Wzossime
Quattuordecuple Kuāssime
Quindecuple Penjssime
Sexdecuple Čissime
Septendecuple Cessime
Octodecuple Assime
Novemdecuple Nanarassime
Viguple Dutāssime

Dates & TimeEdit

How do you write dates? It's pretty weird. For instance, the century is hidden in there somewhere. You write it like the following:

Lundai, zåglr 7ᴷ Janums, 21ᴱᴿᴱ Jar 14.

Monday, the 7th of January 2014.

Monday, the January's 7th, Year 14 of the 21st Century.

BCEdit

To use BC, one says x years before 0

10.000 Jaror ÿevo 0.

10,000 BC (10,000 Years before 0)

LayoutEdit

Mostly the same as the UK with the frequent addition of the century.

DD/MM/YY(/CC)

07/01/14(/21)

TimeEdit

Time is written like decimals:

7`15 Kws.Quarter-Past Seven in the Morning

7`15 Tks.: Quarter-Past Seven in the Afternoon

In speech one would say Ceptāre Flek Onz Penjw Lama Krzwos meaning Seven point One-Five time morning. Replace Krzwos with Trokts for the afternoon. Lama can be omitted.

MoneyEdit

Money (suprise, suprise!) also uses the Flek. Qrōnen is normally used with money if the currency doesn't need to be specified. Qrōnen is neuter (so is all currency) and translates to Common Currency. This is written with a Ɋ.

Ɋ5`50

Penjw Qrōnen Flek Penjw Nillo

Qrōnen cannot be pluralised.

CurrenciesEdit

Currencies are all neuter and follow standard pluralisation only when nominal. Most currencies are directly imported from English, pronounced according to Natraden:

  • Euro
  • Dollar
  • Rupē (Phonetic Rules force double Es into a lengthened one at the end of a word)
  • Peso

The following are the only exceptions:

  • Pound Sterling: Pent [Ctrēllen]
  • Yen: Jen
  • Krone: Qrōne

Translated TextsEdit

Time Measurements

Lord's PrayerEdit

Potrey Iwens

English Natraden Re-Translation
Our Father,

who art in Heaven,

hallowed be Thy Name,

Thy Kingdom come,

Thy Will be done,

on Earth, as it is in Heaven,

Give us this day our daily bread,

and forgive us our trespasses,

as we forgive those who trespass against us,

And lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil,

Amen.

Potrey Iwens et Cōziok,

Uj Iwenj gehopjen Namj Ujs i prazllé,

Uj Rojaplj Ujs geadepen lz geetxaren,

So Venu Ujj boboyt,

Hor Ujj okte et Cōziok boboere,

Uj Verecej Iwens Iweńk gegeben hœt,

Lz Uj Iwenj geondåren få Iwen lozwz etxare,

Hor Iwen Anderj ondåre,

Uj Iwenj Tennack geaucen,

Lz Uj Iwenj geprotekten o lozwz,

Amen.

Our Father in Heaven,

Help us praise your Name,

Come and make your Kingdom,

So everyone will obey you,

Like you are obeyed in Heaven,

Give us our food today,

And forgive us for doing evil,

Like we forgive others,

Kick us out of temptation,

And protect us from evil,

Amen

IdiomsEdit

A few idiomatic phrases.

All Roads lead to RomeEdit

Iž Rom Ÿåorjmultē kan hårllé.

A Room can have many doors.

Back to Square OneEdit

Zegle Gropw Råems.

The tree's seed.

It's raining Cats and DogsEdit

Zegle Cōzio okte grovenere.

The sky is crying.

It's all Greek to me.Edit

Når Nataden et Ick

No language on it

When pigs flyEdit

Wor Lama ggie.

When time stops.

I don't careEdit

Dete Иjevaj i bocpekllé.

There is nothing to talk about.

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