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Omojian/Omojideki
Omoji Deki
Type Agglutinative
Alignment Nominative-Accusative
Head direction Final
Tonal Yes
Declensions Yes
Conjugations Yes
Genders None
Nouns decline according to...
Case Number
Definiteness Gender
Verbs conjugate according to...
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect
Meta-information
Progress 0%
Statistics
Nouns 0%
Verbs 0%
Adjectives 0%
Syntax 0%
Words of 1500
Creator Omoji Nyutorpi

Omojian (known as Omoji Deki or Ǒmoji Deki [ˈɔmɔdʒi dɛkʰi/ˈɔ̌mɔdʒi dɛkʰi] natively) is a language commonly spoken by the people of the Omojian Archipelago; a floating archipelago scattered above the Earth, but descends from a long-lost planet named Pÿzkÿrjă. It is the native language of 1.2 billion people and is the official language and lingua franca of the Omojian Archipelago.

Classification and DialectsEdit

Omojian is a part of the Älgö-Pÿzkic language family within the same branch as Old Jabotanese and heavily borrows grammatical features and vocabulary from the Old Clobzkan and Old Abzaahric language; two languages that are on the Älgögic branch rather than on the Pÿzkic branch.

In order to bridge the civilisations found across the many islands, Omojian is written in three different writing systems based on the cultural background of said islands.

Jabotanese is the most widely used script and is recommended to be learnt first for beginners.

Island Script
Jabotan Jabotanese
Atlan Jabotanese
Tuktaravta Jabotanese
Eukras Jabotanese
Toblisie Jabotanese
Clobzki Clobzkan
Rufaros Jabotanese
Froygr Abzaahric
Deronze Jabotanese
Vianty Jabotanese
Nhang Abzaahric
Abzaahr Abzaahric
Vougre Jabotanese
Ateno'ea Jabotanese
Evetal Abzaahric
Yrenszo Jabotanese
Denuada Clobzkan
Womai'i Jabotanese
Karuyji Clobzkan
Hiro Jabotanese

In the Jabotanese variants of Omojian, tones and vowel length are a necessity to pronounce correctly and use /θ/ and /ð/ as separate sounds, despite sharing the same symbol. Short vowels are sometimes ignored as the Old Jabotanese language did not have short vowels.

In the Abzaahric variant of Omojian, tones aren't usually pronounced because the Old Abzaahric language did not have any tones. Vowel length is still important, but did not have any of the short vowels. /ð/ isn't used in Old Abzaahric, so they replace them with /θ/.

In the Clobzkan variant of Omojian, tones aren't usually pronounced because the Old Clobzkan language did not have any tones. Vowel length is still important and even use an additional three vowels: /ĭ/, /ŏ/, /ŭ/. They also have tones on the short vowel /ă/. /θ/ isn't used in Old Clobzkan, so they replace them with /ð/. The sound /ɘ/ doesn't exist in Old Clobzkan, so they replace them with /i/.

PhonologyEdit

Consonants

Bilabial Labio-dental Dental Alveolar Post-alveolar Palatal Velar Glottal
Nasal m n ɲ ŋ
Plosive pʰ b  tʰ d kʰ g ʔ
Fricative s z ʃ ʒ
Affricate ts tʃ dʒ kx x
Approximant f v θ ð j w h
Flap or tap ɾ
Lateral app. l
  • There are no geminates.
  • /ð/ can only occur at the beginning of a word whilst /θ/ can only occur at the end; preventing gemination (only applies to Jabotanese dialect).

VowelsEdit

Front Near-front Central Back
High i y u
Near-high ɪ̈
High-mid ɘ
Mid
Low-mid ɛ œ ɔ
Near-low æ
Low a

There are also some combinations of vowels that are treated as 'special vowels'.

Special Vowels
a.a*
a.ɛ*
ɔ.ɛ*

(*) The dot indicates that there is a break in between these two vowels.

  • Every vowel can form a dipthong with any other vowel; this includes special vowels forming with other vowels or special vowels.
  • /m/, /n/, /l/ and /ɾ/ can all be used in place of vowels; however they cannot form any dipthongs.
  • /i/, /u/, /ɛ/, /ɔ/ and /a/ all have aspirated forms separate from their voiced forms; represented with / ̤ /.

OrthographyEdit

Even though Omojian is typically written in either of the three scripts, it is very difficult to type in Omojian due to the fact that these scripts can't be correctly formatted by any computing system to this day. To ease in communication, a romanised script has been adapted to the language to ease in typing in Omojian.

Romanised texts for Omojian
Phoneme Grapheme
/ɲ/ gn
/ŋ/ ng
/pʰ/ p
/tʰ/ t
/kʰ/ k
/ʃ/ sh
/ʒ/ zj
/tʃ/ ch
/dʒ/ j
/kx/ kh
/θ/ th
/ð/ dth
/j/ y
/ɾ/* r
/ɾ/** rr
/y/ ü
/ɪ̈/ ï
/ɘ/ ÿ
/ɛ/ e
/œ/ ö
/ɔ/ o
/æ/ ä
/aɔ/ ao
/a.a/ a'a
/a.ɛ/ a'e
.ɛ/ o'e
/a ̤ / a`
/ɛ ̤ / e`
/i ̤ / i`
/ɔ ̤ / o`
/u ̤ / u`

(*) This is /ɾ/ when used as a consonant

(**) This is /ɾ/ when used as a vowel.

Vowel LengthEdit

Just like in languages like Japanese or Thai, the length of the vowel helps to denote meaning. If ignored, this can cause major problems in communications.

Vowel Long Middle Short
/a/ ā a ă
/ɛ/ ē e ĕ
/i/ ī i ĭ*
/ɔ/ ō o ŏ*
/u/ ū u ŭ*
/y/ ǖ ü N/A

(*) These short vowels can only be found in the Clobzkan dialect.

  • The short length vowels /a/ and /ɛ/ are the only short vowels in the Jabotanese dialect.
  • The short length vowels are pronounced in a detatched fashion.

TonesEdit

Although they are not entirely necessary as beginners and children will still be understood to a degree without them, but they do help convey your message better.

There are five tones in Omojian, but only effect the following middle vowels: /a/, /ɛ/, /i/, /ɔ/, /u/ and /y/.

These are the orthography for each of the tones on each vowel.
Vowel Mid Tone Mid-Rising Tone Mid-Falling Tone High-Falling Tone Low-Rising Tone
a /a/ na nạ/nă** nǎ/nả***
e /ɛ/ ne nẹ/nĕ** ně/nẻ***
i /i/ ni nị/nĭ** nǐ/nỉ***
o /ɔ/ no nọ/nŏ** nǒ/nỏ***
u /u/ nu nụ/nŭ** nǔ/nủ***
ü /y/ nụ̈/nü** nǚ/nü̉***
ă* nă* nắ* nằ* nặ** nẳ**

(*) Only used in Clobzkan dialect.

(**) The Clobzkan dialect doesn't have this tone, so they replace them with their short vowels /ă/, /ĕ/, /ĭ/, /ŏ/ and /ŭ/ instead. As for the high-falling tone for /ü/, they are pronounced using the mid tone.

(***)Different symbol is used to represent low-rising tone for Clobzkan dialect.

PhonotacticsEdit

The basic structure is (C)(C)V(C/V)(C)(C). The consonants that can cluster are:

  • /pʰs/
  • /bz/
  • /dz/
  • /kʰs/
  • /gz/
  • /pʃ/
  • /bʒ/

All consonants except  /ɲ/, /ŋ/, /tʃ/, /dʒ/, /kx/, /x/, /θ/, /ð/, /j/, /w/ or /ɾ/ can cluster with /l/.

All consonants except /ɲ/, /ŋ/, /tʃ/, /dʒ/, /kx/, /x/, /θ/, /ð/, /j/ or /ɾ/ can be labialised.

All consonants except /ɲ/, /tʃ/, /dʒ/, /θ/, /ð/, /ɾ/ or /w/ can be palatalised.

Writing System (WIP)Edit

In Omojian, there are three main scripts: Jabotanese, Abzaahric and Clobzkan. The Jabotanese script is an alphabet system that forms characters similar to Korean whilst Abzaahric and Clobzkan are abugidas in similar vains to Hindi or Thai.

Jabotanese Edit

Jabotanese characters are made up of symbols that each represent a sound. Similar to Korean, you stack these symbols to create characters. Unlike Korean, the pattern that is used to form these characters aren't very predicatble but are generally written from the top left corner to the bottom right corner.

Characters can be comprised of multiple syllables and is completely phonetic. Some consonants have two different symbols for the same sound. Jabotanese is written from right to left.

This script is used on Jabotan, Atlan, Tuktaravta, Eukras, Toblisie, Rufaros, Deronze, Hiro, Vianty, Vougre, Atenoea, Yukos and Womai'i.

The Jabotanese Script
a á à ǎ ā ă a` ä
ao a'a a'e e é è ě ē
ĕ e` ÿ i i í ì ǐ ī
i` ï o ó ò ǒ ō o`
ö o'e u ú ù ǔ ū u`
ü ǘ ǜ ụ̈ ǚ ǖ b k d
dth th ch f g h x j l m
n gn ng p r rr s sh t
v w y z ts kh zj . ˝ *
, " "

(*) See Noun Cases

AbzaahricEdit

The Abzaahric script is an abugida like Hindi where you have a base consonant and modify it in some way to form the vowel that is pronounced alongside it. Abzaahric is written from right to left. You have to remember the tones necessary in each character as the characters don't reference which tones to use.

This script is used on Froygr, Nhang, Abzaahr and Evetal.

The Abzaahric Script
a ā a` ä ao a'a a'e e
ē e` ÿ i i ī i` ï o
ō o` ö o'e u ū u` ü
ǖ b k d th ch f g
h x j l m n gn ng
p r rr s sh t v w
y z ts kh zj . ?* !**
˝*** , " "

(*) Instead of writing out the question markers /zju/, /na/ and /ne/, they will use this symbol. Context of the sentence will tell you which of them to use.

(**) Instead of writing out the command marker /i/, they will use this symbol.

(***) 'See Noun Cases

ClobzkanEdit

The Clobzkan script is an abugida like Thai where you have a base consonant that add a diacritic mark either above, below or beside the consonant to form the vowel that is pronounced alongside it. Clobzkan is written from right to left. You have to remember the tones necessary in each character as the characters don't reference which tones to use.

This script is used in Clobzki, Denuada and Karuyji.

The Clobzkan Script
a ā ă a` ä ao a'a a'e
e ē ĕ e` i ī ĭ i`
ï o ō ŏ o` ö o'e u
ū ŭ u` ü ǖ b k d
dth ch f g h x j l
m n gn ng p r rr s
sh t v w y z ts kh
zj . ˝* , " "

(*) See Noun Cases

Grammar (WIP)Edit

NounsEdit

Noun Cases:Edit

There are seven different declensions in Omojian. They are:

Noun Declensions of Omojian
Locative Dative Instrumental Genitive Vocative Equative

In Omojian, nominative and accusative cases aren't usually indicated by declensions, but are indicated by the general sentence structure (SOV).

Example: 

J. & C. Transliteration: pan ryún méin-da de.

A. Transliteration: pan ryun mein-da de.

English: I see the cat.

Word for Word: I(S) the cat(O) see(V)

Case Affix Example
Locative (word)-tem pan tù/tu-tem ód-os de.
I am walking to you.
Dative* ˝(word) pan tù/tu ya-ki ˝ryún/ryun de.
I am giving you the cat.
Instrumental (word)-ni pan thas kái/kai-ki a`n-ni de.
I am eating fruit with a fork.
Genitive (word)-ọ/o/ŏ panọ/o/ŏ ío.
My right eye.
Vocative** (word)-gna/gnüa pan Àgúédā/Agueda-gna/gnüa jolà-tái.
I am speaking to Agueda.
Equative (word)-to pan àgú-to gnüĕ/gnüe-tái de.
I am smelling like a flower.

(*) To pronounce /˝/, simply repeat the first sound of the word. Like p'pan or e'ere.

(**) See Honorifics

Honorifics:Edit

In Omojian, honorifics are determined by the status of person to whom they are speaking of. They are compulsory when constructing sentences involving the name of the person.

Honorifics of Omojian
Honorific Meaning Example
-gna Used when talking to a person of the same or lower status than you. brothers, sisters, children, pets
-gnüa Used when talking to a person of higher status than you. parents, grandparents, leaders, bosses

The examples aren't limits for who you can use each of these honorifics for. If a place or object holds great significance to the speaker, they can use /gnüa/. This is also applicable to people that the speaker holds deep respect for which can include siblings, children or pets. This does mean that you can inversely use the equal/low status honorific for people that the public would generally consider higher than the speaker. Although, it is fairly rude.

Number Declensions:Edit

Nouns can decline based on the amount of that noun is being described. This can differ based on if you know the exact number or not.

Number Declensions in Omojian
Number Declension Meaning Examples
(word)-kā Can be used to indicate general plurality or if the number is unknown. ryún/ryun-
cats
(number)-vï-(word) Can be used to indicate exact number of objects. xek-vï-ryún/ryun
three cats
  • Sometimes both of the declensions can be used together, but only when you know the exact number.

Example:  J. & C. Romanisation: xek-vï-ryún-

A. Romanisation: xek-vï-ryun-

English: three 'cats

Numbers in Omojian
Number Transliteration Symbol
0 vité/vite
1 hō'ó/hō'o
2 jüz
3 xek
4 nüot
5 gälé/gäle
6 tọres/tores/tŏres
7 dthi/thi
8 kwaÿ
9 ngụa/ngua/ngŭa
10 da'a
  • To indicate a negative number, you put (vité/vite) in front of the number.

VerbsEdit

Verb Cases:Edit

There are five special cases in Omojian that are used to describe how the action is being done.

Verb Cases of Omojian
Physical Sensual Abstractive Moving Skillful

Each of these cases can apply to almost all verbs. A verb doesn't belong to a case, but changes to better fit the purpose of the verb in the sentence. However, you can't have more than one case on a verb at a time. 

The classes are arranged in a hierarchy to demonstrate which case overrides other cases.

Case Affix Meaning Example
Physical -ki Used for when the subject and object of a sentence are physically touching in some way and doesn't provoke much thought to via the verb. mè/me pan ya-ki ˝mrr de.
He gives it to me (generic and requires little effort)
Sensual -tái/tai Used for when the subject and object of a sentence are interacting with each other through any of the senses and provokes a meaningful thought. Also used to denote that the action was done out of compassion or love by the speaker. Cancels out the physical case. mè/me pan ya-tái/tai ˝mrr de.
He gives it to me (meaningful and may involve bonding)
Abstractive -da Used for when the subject and object of a sentence are interacting with each other through any other means that don't fit the physical or sensual cases. Also used to denote that the action was done out of compassion or love from the perspective that isn't directly involved in the action. Cancels out the physical and sensual cases. mè/me pan ya-da ˝mrr de.
He gives it to me (not anything physical)
Moving -os Used for when the subject is moving or have moved in some way to the object. Cancels out the physical, sensual and abstract cases. mè/me pan-tem ya-os ˝mrr de.
He gives it to me (requires movement from one place to another)
Skillful -dàn/dan Used for when the subject is doing something with talent or can be interpreted from many perspectives to the object. Also used to denote that an action was done skillfully as a compliment. Cancels out the physical, sensual, abstract and moving cases. mè/me pan ya-dàn/dan ˝mrr de.
He gives it to me (in a certain way; always complemented by an adjective)

Often with these cases, their meanings can be quite subjective. 

Example:

J. & C. Romanisation: wo wo jolà-ki de.

A. Romanisation: wo wo jola-ki de.

English: We talk to ourselves.


J. & C. Romanisation: wo wo jolà-tái de.

A. Romanisation: wo wo jola-tai de.

English: We talk to ourselves.


J. & C. Romanisation: wo wo jolà-da de.

A. Romanisation: wo wo jola-da de.

English: We talk to ourselves.

All of these sentences can mean the same thing, but may hinge at a slightly different meaning. For example the first example may involve talking directly to themselves. The second example may imply that a bond is forming while talking. The third example may be just generically talking to one another. However, they could also refer to the same thing in this context, so it can be a matter of preference for some verbs.

Verb Moods:Edit

There are 5 grammatical moods in Omojian they are:

Grammatical Moods of Omojian
Conditional Optative Imperative Certain (Temporary Name) Interrogative

These are used to help illustrate their attitude to what they're saying. Unlike the verb cases, these can overlap one another to express multiple moods.

Conditional:Edit

The conditional mood is used to express that an event will happen if the condition is met. There are prepositions for both the condition and the effect to imply the conditional mood.

Preposition Meaning Example
kwe used to outline the condition. kwe pan kái-tÿ, dwa pan téo kái-ki kon.
dwa used to outline the outcome of the condition.
If I am hungry, then I will eat fruit.
Optative:Edit

The optative mood is used to express wishes and hopes for the statement in question. There is a positive and a negative suffix used to indicate the optative mood. This mood can stack alongside the verb cases.

Suffix Meaning Example
-yại/yai/yăi used to express a wish or hope that is wanted by the speaker. mà zjụrital/zjurital/zjŭrital ĕm-ki-yại/yai/yăi.
She wishes to drink tea.
-sǔī/suī used to express a wish or hope that is unwanted by the speaker. mà zjụrital/zjurital/zjŭrital ĕm-ki-sǔī/suī.
She wishes to not drink tea.
Imperative:Edit

The imperative mood is used to express commands and prohibitions. There is a positive and a negative postposition used to indicate the imperative mood.

Postposition Meaning Examples
i used to express a command or request for someone to follow. méin/mein-tái/tai ˝pan i!
Look at me!
o` used to express a prohibition for someone to follow. méin/mein-tái/tai ˝pan o`!
Don't look at me!
Certain Mood (Temporary Name):Edit

The (certain) mood is used to express the certainty that the claimant has about the statement in question. There are five levels of certainty and are placed at the end of the entire sentence.

Levels of Certainty in Omojian
Level Likelihood Word Example
certain 100% happening so pan xin meï-da-ke yo so.
I definitely read the book.
likely 75% happening sho pan xin meï-da-ke sho.
I am pretty sure that I have read the book.
unsure 50% happening jo pan xin meï-da-ke jo.
I am unsure if I have read the book.
unlikely 75% not happening ra pan xin meï-da-ke ra.
I am pretty sure that I haven't read the book.
impossible 100% not happening ré/re pan xin meï-da-ke ré/re.
I definitely did not read the book.
Interrogative:Edit

The interrogative mood is used to ask questions or have the listener give an opinion on a statement. In Omojian, there are three ways to express the interrogative mood as well as words that you use to denote that the statement is a direct response to each of them.

Question Particle Meaning Response Particle Example
na Used to ask open ended questions with no set answers. naí/nai ga'a ˝tù/tu-tem na?
Where are you?
pan dikirrop-kā-tem naí/nai.
I am at the shops.
zju Used to ask questions that have set answers to choose from. zjuk tù/tu dikirrop-kā-tem zju?
Are you at the shops?
Moi zjuk.
Yes.
ne Used to ask the listener to give their opinion on a statement. rù/ru Imi dikirrop-kā-tem rái/rai-shi ne?
This store is nice, don't you think?
Pan tù/tu moit-tái/tai rù/ru.
I agree with you.

SyntaxEdit

Lexicon (WIP)Edit

Example text (WIP)Edit

J. & C. Romanisation: pan tù jolà-tá˝ǒmojideki de so.

A. Romanisation: pan tu jola-tai ˝omojideki de so.

Jabotanese:

Abzaahric:

Clobzkan:

English: I am currently speaking to you in Omojian.

Word for Word: I you speak(sensual case) (dative case)Omojian (present tense) (100% certain).


J. Romanisation: sö mǔ-ọ neÿg-kā- xao jö-ki-ke rái-ni yo.

A. Romanisation: sö mu-o neÿg-kā-o xao jö-ki-ke rai-ni yo.

C. Romanisation: sö mǔ-ŏ neig-kā-ŏ xao jö-ki-ke rái-ni yo.

Jabotanese:

Abzaahric:

Clobzkan:

English: The wind has danced beneath it's wings with grace.

Word for Word: wind (pronoun for animals)(genitive case) wing(plural marker)(genitive case) beneath dance(physical case)(completed action) grace(instrumental case) (past tense).

J. Romanisation: àkä-i! ga'a-tem pan nha al-ki ˝pan-ọ kaso oga na i?

A. Romanisation: akä-i! ga'a-tem pan nha al-ki ˝pan-o kaso oga na i?

C. Romanisation: àkä-i! ga'a-tem pan nha al-ki ˝pan-ŏ kaso oga na i?

Jabotanese:

Abzaahric:

Clobzkan:

English: Please! Where can I get help for my sister?

Word for Word: please(imperative mood)! where(locative marker) I help receive(physical case) (dative case)I(gentive case) sister(dative case) can (open question marker) (imperative mood)?

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