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Ralinu

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Raeliny
Raelíny
/raliːny/
Type
Agglutinative
Alignment
Nominative-Accusative
Head direction
Head-initial
Tonal
No
Declensions
Yes
Conjugations
Yes
Genders
0
Nouns decline according to...
Case Number
Definiteness Gender
Verbs conjugate according to...
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect



General informationEdit

Ralinu (Raelíny, the language of the Ra) is a language isolate spoken in the Murmansk Oblast of Russia. As a language isolate, there are no languages known to be related to it, but there are many influences from the Finno-Uralic languages (i.e. Estonian, Finnish), Swedish, and Russian in both grammatical structure and vocabulary. The language's articles, adjectives, and nouns are agglutinative (they can be combined into one word). The nouns can be declined in about 10 grammatical cases (although 3 have fallen out of common use). Vowel and consonant harmony is prominent in the language, distinguishing between voiced consonants and the vowels that are associated with them (a, b, d, dj, dzj, g, o, u, v, z, and zj/ç), the voiceless consonants the vowels associated with them (e, p, t, kj/tj/c, tsj, k, i, y, f, s, and sj), and the neutral consonants (dh, h, j, l, m, n, ǹ, r, and '). Also common is lengthened vowels, but stress has fallen out of common use and has to be marked.

PhonologyEdit

ConsonantsEdit

Bilabial Labio-dental Dental Alveolar Post-alveolar Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Pharyngeal Epiglottal Glottal
Plosive p b t d* c ɟ k g
Nasal m n
Fricative f v ð s z ʃ ʒ h
Affricate t͡ʃ d͡ʒ
Approximant j
Trill r
Flap or tap
Lateral fric.
Lateral app. l
Lateral flap

The click /ǃ/ is also featured in the language, albiet rarely.

  • Pronounced in some dialects as /ɾ/

VowelsEdit

Front Near-front Central Near-back Back
Close i y ʉ u
Near-close
Close-mid e ø
Mid
Open-mid ɔ
Near-open æ
Open ä

OrthographyEdit

Because the language features consonant and vowel harmony, many of the symbols are not counted as letters. Only voiced consonants, their corresponding vowels, and neutral consonants are counted in the alphabet, with the other consonants being seen as allophones. Some sounds are written in several different ways, depending on the vowel following it.

The actual alphabet consists of:

A /ä/ B /b/ D /d/ Dh /ð/ Dj /ɟ/ Dzj /d͡ʒ/ G /g/ H /h/ J /j/ L /l/
M /m/ N /n/ Ǹ /ǃ/ O /ɔ/ R /r/ U /u/ V /v/ Z /z/ Zj/Ç /ʒ/ ' /∅/

These letters (except for the neutral dh, h, j, l, m, n, ǹ, r, and ') are seen as inferior to the voiceless consonants and their corresponding vowels, and so the consonants change and the vowels shift to accommodate.

The corresponding letters are:

E /e/* P /p/ T /t/ Dh /ð/ Kj/Tj/C /c/ Tsj /t͡ʃ/ K /k/ H /h/ J /j/ L /l/
M /m/ N /n/ Ǹ /ǃ/ I /i/* R /r/ Y /y/* F /f/ S /s/ Sj /ʃ/ ' /ʔ/

The sounds /ʒ/ and /c/ can be written in several different ways.

  • For /ʒ/
    • Zj: at the beginning of a word
    • Ç: anywhere else in a word
  • For /c/
    • Kj: before the letter "e" or diphthong "ae"
    • Tj: before the letter "i" or diphthong "oe"
    • C: before the letter "y" or diphthong "uy"

The vowels a, o, and u (the original vowels) never shift completely to their corresponding vowel (the goal vowels). Instead, they shift to a median of the two vowels (the product vowel), which is written as a diphthong.

Original Vowel Goal Vowel Product Vowel
a e ae /æ/
o /ɔ/ i /i/ oe /ø/
u /u/ y /y/ uy /ʉ/

Vowels and diphthongs can be marked with either the grave or acute accents. The grave accent marks abnormal stress in the word (the language does not have much stress, because of the varying vowel lengths). The acute accent marks a longer vowel [IPA: ː], such as in the word (/tiː/, road). No more than one accent may appear in a word, so the vowel must be written twice if the more than one vowel is of abnormal length. Some people, however, write the vowel twice anyway (in the style of Finnish and Estonian), because of either a personal choice or software incompatibility. In diphthongs, the acute accent is marked on the first letter, such as the word fáehyysi (/fæːhy/, purple house). If more than one diphthong is long, the second diphthong's first letter is written twice, such as in lóepaaenylle (/løːpæːnylːe/, flying fairy). Consonants can also be doubled by writing the letter (or the first letter in a digraph or trigraph) twice, such as in ykkyllaepoe (/ykːylːæpø/, strange plant) or jaemaettsiní (/jæmæt͡ʃiniː/, rough river).

PhonotacticsEdit

Depending on the type of word, there are different consonant-vowel patterns. Lengthened consonants, lengthened vowels, and diphthongs each count as one consonant or vowel.

  • Non-declined nouns can take on a combination of CVCV and CVCCV clusters. Noun declensions are a CV suffix.


  • Adjectives can also be CVCV, but also can have the unique cluster VCV.


  • Infinitive verbs are always CVCVC, and the last consonant is always an "r" or an "m". Conjugations usually replace the last C, and the suffixes are usually CV, CCV, or CVCV (for the last one, the final C is usually ').


  • Prepositions and other words usually follow a CVCV pattern.

GrammarEdit

Gender Cases Numbers Tenses Persons Moods Voices Aspects
Verb No No No No No No No No
Nouns No No No No No No No No
Adjectives No No No No No No No No
Numbers No No No No No No No No
Participles No No No No No No No No
Adverb No No No No No No No No
Pronouns No No No No No No No No
Adpositions No No No No No No No No
Article No No No No No No No No
Particle No No No No No No No No

NounsEdit

CasesEdit

There are fifteen cases in Ralinu, but only ten declentions. Three of these cases are obsolete and have replaced by another case in colloquial speech (such as the partitive case being replaced by dative case), but are still used in classical writing.

  1. The Nominative and Accusative Cases (NOM/ACC)
    1. The nominative case denotes the subject of the sentence.
    2. The accusative case denotes the direct object of the sentence.
    3. These nouns can be spotted because they have no suffix and are written as they are in the dictionary.
  2. The Dative and Genitive Cases (DAT/GEN)
    1. The dative case denotes the indirect object of the sentence.
    2. The genitive case denotes ownership and possession.
    3. These nouns are declined in words with voiced consonants by adding the letter "z" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "balja" (skin, NOM/ACC) is declined as "baljaz" (skin, DAT/GEN).
    4. These nouns are declined in words with voiceless consonants by adding the letter "s" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "sihi" (tree, NOM/ACC) is declined as "sihis" (tree, DAT/GEN).
  3. The Comitative and Casual Cases (COM/CAS)
    1. The comitative case indicates the object that the subject is with.
    2. The casual case indicates the object that is the cause of an event.
    3. These nouns are declined from NOM/ACC case by lengthening the final vowel (if the vowel already is long, then it is left alone), then adding the letter "m". This works for both words with voiced consonants and word with voiceless consonants.
      1. For example, the word "laço" (dog, NOM/ACC) is declined as "laçóm" (dog, COM/CAS). The word "píry" (bone, NOM/ACC) is declined as "píryym" (bone, COM/CAS).
  4. The Privative and Aversive Cases (PRI/AVE)
    1. The privative case indicates the object that the subject is without.
    2. The aversive case indicates the object that is being avoided.
    3. These nouns are declined from NOM/ACC case by lengthening the final vowel (if the vowel already is long, then it is left alone), then adding the letter "n". This works for both words with voiced consonants and word with voiceless consonants.
      1. For example, the word "laço" (dog, NOM/ACC) is declined as "laçón" (dog, PRI/AVE). The word "píry" (bone, NOM/ACC) is declined as "píryyn" (bone, PRI/AVE).
  5. The Prepositional Case (PRE)
    1. Denotes the object that is being described with a preposition.
    2. These nouns are declined from NOM/ACC case by adding the letter "j" after a, e, o, u, or y.
      1. ​For example, the word "ruttu" (root, NOM/ACC) is declined as "ruttuj" (root, PRE).
    3. ​Nouns that end in "i", such as "sihi" (tree, NOM/ACC) are declined by lengthening the final "i" (i.e. "sihí" (tree, PRE)).
  6. ​The Translative and Semblative Cases (TRA/SEM)
    1. ​The translative case denotes what the subject is being changed into.
    2. The semblative case denotes what the subject resembles.
    3. These nouns are declined in words with voiced consonants by adding the letter "d" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "balja" (skin, NOM/ACC) is declined as "baljad" (skin, TRA/SEM).
    4. These nouns are declined in words with voiceless consonants by adding the letter "t" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "senje" (man, NOM/ACC) is declined as "senjet" (man, TRA/SEM).
  7. The Instrumental Case (INS)
    1. Denotes with what tool a task is completed with.
    2. These nouns are declined in words with voiced consonants by adding the letter "b" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "balja" (skin, NOM/ACC) is declined as "baljab" (skin, INS).
    3. These nouns are declined in words with voiceless consonants by adding the letter "p" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "sihi" (tree, NOM/ACC) is declined as "sihip" (tree, INS).
  8. The Partitive Case (obsolete) (PAR)
    1. States a specific amount of an object from a larger group.
    2. Is mostly replaced by the dative case.
    3. These nouns are declined in words with voiced consonants by adding the letters "gá" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "ruttu" (root, NOM/ACC) is declined as "ruttugá" (root, PAR).
    4. These nouns are declined in words with voiceless consonants by adding the letters "ké" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "píry" (bone, NOM/ACC) is declined as "pírykee" (bone, PAR).
  9. The Ablative and Ornative Cases (obsolete) (ABL/ORN)
    1. The ablative case states the object being talked about in a discussion (i.e. We must talk about the money.).
    2. The ornative case states that the something is being equipped with the object.
    3. Is mostly replaced by the casual case.
    4. These nouns are declined from NOM/ACC case by adding the letter "r". This works for both words with voiced consonants and word with voiceless consonants.
      1. For example, the word "laço" (dog, NOM/ACC) is declined as "laçor" (dog, ABL/ORN). The word "píry" (bone, NOM/ACC) is declined as "píryr" (bone, ABL/ORN).
  10. The Distributive Case (obsolete) (DIS)
    1. Works alongside the partitive case, but is on the receiving end. (Kilmi kýleekeenae hysysjí, [three people-PAR house-DIS] three people per house)
    2. Mostly replaced by the dative case.
    3. These nouns are declined in words with voiced consonants by adding the letters "zjó" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "ruttu" (root, NOM/ACC) is declined as "ruttuzjó" (root, DIS).
    4. These nouns are declined in words with voiceless consonants by adding the letters "sjí" to the end of the word in NOM/ACC case.
      1. For example, the word "senje" (bone, NOM/ACC) is declined as "senjesjí" (bone, DIS).

NumberEdit

Ralinu does have a dual number. The number can be changed by changing the final vowel of the word. These vowels work in a cycle.

For the letters a, o, and u, the cycle is: A <--> O <--> U <--> A. 

For the letters e, i, and y, the cycle is: E <--> I <--> Y <--> E.

The dual number is determined (using the written cycles above) by using the vowel to the right of the singular's final vowel. For example, to write "two dogs", one would write "laçu". To write "two trees", one would write "sihy".

The plural number is determined (using the written cycles above) by using the vowel to the left of the singular's final vowel. For example, to write "dogs", one would write "laça". To write "trees", one would write "sihe".

Examples of Declension and NumberEdit

ruttu Singular Dual Plural
NOM/ACC ruttu rutta rutto
DAT/GEN ruttuz ruttaz ruttoz
COM/CAS ruttúm ruttám ruttóm
PRI/AVE ruttún ruttán ruttón
PRE ruttuj ruttaj ruttoj
SEM/TRA ruttud ruttad ruttod
INS ruttub ruttab ruttob
PAR ruttugá ruttugá ruttugá
ABL ruttur ruttar ruttor
DIS ruttuzjó ruttazjó ruttozjó


senje

Singular Dual Plural
NOM/ACC senje senji senjy
DAT/GEN senjes senjis senjys
COM/CAS senjém senjím senjým
PRI/AVE senjén senjín senjýn
PRE senjej senjí senjyj
SEM/TRA senjet senjit senjyt
INS senjep senjib senjyb
PAR senjeké senjiké senjyké
ABL senjer senjir senjyr
DIS senjesjí senjisjí senjysjí

ArticlesEdit

Like in the Scandinavian languages (i.e. Norwegian), there are indefinite and definite articles. The indefinite articles are left as separate words before the noun, while the definite articles are attached as a suffix. However, some rules do apply to where indefinite articles are placed when in contact with prepositions and genitive case nouns being used as adjectives.

The article for words with voiced consonants is "naj". In the word "vojla" (bird, NOM/ACC), the article is placed before the word to indicate indefiniteness ("naj vojla") and after the word to indicate definiteness ("vojlanaj").

The definite article (and, in practice, the indefinite article) for words with voiceless consonants is "nae" (the neutralized form of "naj" with the "j" dropped). In the word "lime" (mother, NOM/ACC), it is placed either before or after the word to indicate indefiniteness and definiteness, respectively ("nae lime", "limenae").

Articles are never pluralized. Although it technically is correct to keep the indefinite article as "naj" all the time (because it is a separate word and is allowed to have a different word harmony than the noun it describes), almost all speakers use "nae" when the next word is one with voiceless consonants.

When a genitive noun is used as an adjective (attached to the object), the indefinite article separates the two words. For example, in the word "menkislime" (child-DAT/GEN mother-NOM/ACC, child's mother), the indefinite article "nae" comes between the two words to form the phrase "menkis nae lime" (child-DAT/GEN article-idf mother-NOM/ACC, a child's mother). However, the definite article is still attached to the end of the word and does not split the word, making "menkislimenae" (child-DAT/GEN mother-NOM/ACC article-df, the child's mother). Words are not separated when one of the words is actually an adjective (nae oecúylyppee and oecúylyppeenae rather than oecúy nae lyppee and oecúy lyppeenae).

Prepositions, which are placed before the noun, also affect the place of the indefinite article. The indefinite article is placed before the preposition in this case. For example, "under [a/the] tree" is translated as "syper sihí". The indefinite article is placed before the phrase, making the entire phrase "nae syper sihí" (article-idf prep-sub tree-PRE). The definite article, again, is still attached to the object ("syper sihínae"). Another example is "zobol elimmitjimílyppee" (above [a/the] small flower), which can be "naj zobol elimmitjimílyppee" or "zobol elimmitjimílyppeenae".

The partitive case always requires the definite article.

Adjectives, Genitive Nouns, and Adjectivial NounsEdit

Nouns can be used as adjectives, such as in "sihipíry" (branch, or literally "tree bone"). Since Ralinu is of an agglutinative nature, these words are attached to the object described as a prefix. Vowel and consonant harmony is employed on these words as to not affect the object itself, such as in the word "zoehoelana" (forest), which is the combination of the words "sihi" (tree) and "lana" (land). The word "sihi" has been neutralized to fit the nature of the word "lana" by voicing the consonants and compromising the vowels. Cases, number, and definiteness do not affect adjectives.

PronounsEdit

Ralinu: Declension of personal pronouns
1 2 3/4
singular NOM/ACC le zu fe
DAT les zus fes
GEN les- zus- fes-
COM/CAS lém zúm fém
PRI/AVE lén zún fén
PRE lej zuj fej
TRA/SEM let zud fet
INS lep zub fep
dual NOM/ACC li za fi
DAT lis zas fis
GEN lis- zas- fis-
COM/CAS lím zám fím
PRI/AVE lín zán fín
PRE zaj
TRA/SEM lit zad fit
INS lip zab fip
plural NOM/ACC ly zo fy
DAT lys zos fys
GEN lys- zos- fys-
COM/CAS lým zóm fým
PRI/AVE lýn zón fýn
PRE lyj zoj fyj
TRA/SEM lyt zod fyt
INS lyp zob fyp
Ralinu: Reflexive pronouns
1 2 3
singular -m verbs lé- zú- fé-
-r verbs -lé -zú -fé
dual -m verbs lí- zá- fí-
-r verbs -lí -zá -fí
plural -m verbs lý- zó- fý-
-r verbs -lý -zó -fý

Interrogative PronounsEdit

who - sjem, sjemi (du./pl.)
what - aça, açu (pl.)
when - rýle
where - dzjóna
why - tjim
which (general) - kjéne, kjéni (du.), kjény (pl.)
which (partitive) - kjénekee, kjénikee (du.), kjénykee (pl.)
how many - djado

Relative PronounsEdit

who - zjaem, zjaemoe (du./pl.)
what - aesjae, aesjuy (du.pl.)
when - rúylae
where - tsjóenae
why - djoem
which (general) - djáenae, djáenoe (du.), djáenuy (pl.)
which (partitive) - djáenaekaae, djáenoekaae (du.), djáenuykaae (pl.)
how many - kjaetoe

Demonstrative PronounsEdit

this - garo-/kaeroe-, garu-/kaeruy- (du.), gara-/kaerae- (pl.)
that - dhúno-/dhúynoe-, dhúnu-/dhúynuy- (du.), dhúna-/dhúynae- (pl.)

Existential PronounsEdit

someone - kékii, kékee (du./pl.)
something - míski, míske (du./pl.)
some - jodjuda-/joecuytae-

Free Choice PronounsEdit

anyone - minít
anything - mini
any - gumbago-/kuympaegoe-
either - zae'uytsáe/se'ytsé-

Universal PronounsEdit

everyone - gogó
everything - koek
every - dono-/toenoe-

VerbsEdit

VocabularyEdit

gúylooevoonna - fat (n.)

kýlee - man (human being)



No. English Raeliny
1Ile
2you (singular)zu
3heContionary_Wiki
4weli/ly
5you (plural)za/zo
6theyfi/fy
7thisgaro/kaeroe
8thatdhúno/dhúynoe
9hereki
10therela
11whosjem
12whataça
13wheredzjóna
14whenrýle
15howtjime
16notessje
17alldono/toenoe
18manymilte
19somejodjuda/joecytae
20fewooko/óekoe
21otherodoro
22oneyki
23twokaka
24threekolmo
25fourneje
26fivefísi
27bigsúru
28longadho
29widemuru/muyruy
30thickoloo/oelóe
31heavyudzja/uytsjae
32smallelimmi
33shortjikki
34narrowbáno/paaeǹoe
35thinoddjú/oecúy
36womangala
37man (adult male)senje
38man (human being)Contionary_Wiki
39childmenki
40wifeboba
41husbandbobo
42motherlime
43fatherlimi
44animalpý'y
45fishpiseke
46birdvojla
47doglaço
48louserine
49snakezaça
50wormmýjoo
51treesihi
52forestzoehoelana
53sticksihipíry
54fruit'ipe
55seed'ipemenki
56leaflyppé
57rootruttu
58barkzoehoebjala
59flowertjimílyppee
60grasselimmisihe
61ropepopra
62skinbjala
63meatkarno
64bloodgúylooesapno
65bonepíry
66fatContionary_Wiki
67egg'anmá'ipemenki
68horn'áj
69tailmisjne
70feather'aenmáelyppee
71hairkeppli
72headnýfe
73eargoho
74eyegoço
75nosedheri
76mouthsysje
77toothsysjepíry
78tonguemýlke
79fingernailzjádhroo
80footpélii
81legmugu
82kneemetemugu
83handmano
84wingodhu
85bellypyfí
86gutsvúlo
87neckféli
88backcysi
89breastrínte
90heartsyte
91livermagza
92drinkpeper
93eatkimem
94bitetsju'ar
95suckmajzdzjar
96spitsykim
97vomitvomam
98blowfýlim
99breathezjagar
100laughbolam
101see'adzjur
102hear'ogvum
103knowseper
104thinkpensem
105smellzinim
106fearbólkoor
107sleeptimir
108livenunsom
109diemoror
110killmadar
111fightpjeséjm
112hunt'anmámadar
113hitmálor
114cutlú'am
115splitnískjir
116stabtykkyr
117scratchvugar
118dighýrem
119swimrishym
120flyContionary_Wiki
121walkandar
122comedullar
123liesjylír
124sitsjýleem
125standhíper
126turncyser
127falltéppeem
128givekjitir
129holdpifnir
130squeezebávdom
131rubno'ar
132washbóçar
133wiperajam
134pullnalar
135pushzájar
136throwjogor
137tienúrur
138sewrubóm
139countkon'am
140saypétym
141singkanajm
142playgáhom
143floatjoçram
144flowséssyr
145freezekefir
146swellhymym
147sunjohu
148moondjoha
149stardugo
150waterContionary_Wiki
151rainContionary_Wiki
152riverContionary_Wiki
153lakeContionary_Wiki
154seaContionary_Wiki
155saltContionary_Wiki
156stoneContionary_Wiki
157sandContionary_Wiki
158dustContionary_Wiki
159earthContionary_Wiki
160cloudContionary_Wiki
161fogContionary_Wiki
162skyContionary_Wiki
163windContionary_Wiki
164snowContionary_Wiki
165iceContionary_Wiki
166smokeContionary_Wiki
167fireContionary_Wiki
168ashContionary_Wiki
169burnContionary_Wiki
170roadContionary_Wiki
171mountainContionary_Wiki
172redContionary_Wiki
173greenContionary_Wiki
174yellowContionary_Wiki
175whiteContionary_Wiki
176blackContionary_Wiki
177nightContionary_Wiki
178dayContionary_Wiki
179yearContionary_Wiki
180warmContionary_Wiki
181coldContionary_Wiki
182fullContionary_Wiki
183newContionary_Wiki
184oldContionary_Wiki
185goodContionary_Wiki
186badContionary_Wiki
187rottenContionary_Wiki
188dirtyContionary_Wiki
189straightContionary_Wiki
190roundContionary_Wiki
191sharpContionary_Wiki
192dullContionary_Wiki
193smoothContionary_Wiki
194wetContionary_Wiki
195dryContionary_Wiki
196correctContionary_Wiki
197nearContionary_Wiki
198farContionary_Wiki
199rightContionary_Wiki
200leftContionary_Wiki
201atContionary_Wiki
202inContionary_Wiki
203withContionary_Wiki
204andContionary_Wiki
205ifContionary_Wiki
206becauseContionary_Wiki
207nameContionary_Wiki


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