Fandom

Conlang

Comments0

Gibberish Inspired Celtic conlangs

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

This is a list of Celtic languages made by Gibberish Inspired.

Gibberish Inspired (talk) 01:46, February 22, 2014 (UTC)

Continental Celtic 

  • Gaulish (not a Gi conlang)
    • Early Embean - 300s-1200s
      • Middle Embean - 1300s-1600s
        • Modern Embean - 1700s-today

-Embean is influenced by Emaluan, a Finnic language.

  • Gaulish (not a GI conlang)
    • Early Pladisese - 700s-1500s
      • Modern Pladisese - 1600s-today

-Pladisese is spoken in Germany. It heavily influenced by German. It is also influenced by Latin.

  • Gaulish (not a GI conlang)
    • Early Alpese - 800s-1600s
      • Modern Alpese - 1700s-today

-Alpese is influenced by German. Alpese is closely related to both Lepontic & Noric.

  • Gaulish (not a GI conlang)
    • Early Plamean - 600s-1000s
      • Middle Plamean - 1100s-1700s
        • Modern Plamean - 1800s-today

-Plamean is spoken in Italy. It is influenced by Latin & Punic. It is related to Lepontic & Lusitanian.

  • Gaulish (not a GI conlang)
    • Galatian (not a GI conlang)
      • Pidigramese - 1000s-today

-Pidigramese is heavily influenced by Aramaic & Armenian.

  • Hispano-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Early Erunoan - 100s-600s
      • Middle Erunoan - 700s-1400s
        • Late Erunoan - 1500s-1700s

-Erunoan is influenced by Basque. Erunoan is related to Lusitanian, Tartessian, & Celtiberian.

  • Hispano-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Gallaecian (not a GI conlang)
      • Neo-Gallaecian - 1500s-1900s
        • Denshananian - 1600s-today

-Denshananian is spoken in New Brunswick. It is influenced by the native Algonquian languages.

Goidelic Celtic

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Senan - 1300s-today

-Senan is heavily influenced by English.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Miklosanian - 1300s-today

-Miklosanian is heavily influenced by English. It is also influenced by Arabic. It is closely related to Manx & Irish.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Kladerifinese - 1300s-today

-Kladerifinese is spoken in the Netherlands and in Northwestern Germany. It is heavily Ifluenced by Dutch & Frisian. It is closely related to Gaelic & Manx.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Thinsic - 1600s-today

-Thinsic is a mixture of Irish, Manx, Gaelic, & Greek. Some classify it as a creole. It is spoken in Crete.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Cordian - 1300s-today

-Cordian is influenced by English & Cornish. It is related to Gaelic & Irish.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Irish (not a GI conlang)
      • Elionese - 1600s-today

-Elionese is heavily influenced by Greek. It is also influenced by English & French. It is spoken in Brittany.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Irish (not a GI conlang)
      • Stassic - 1500s-today

-Stassic is spoken in Scotland & England. It is heavily influenced by English. It is also influenced by Dutch & German.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Gaelic (not a GI conlang)
      • Egedese - 1600s-today

-Egedese is influenced by Greek.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Gaelic (not a GI conlang)
      • Casidese - 1600s-today

-Casidese is influenced by Greek & Pictish.

  • Middle Irish (not a GI conlang)
    • Manx (not a GI conlang)
      • Enloan - 1800s-today

-Enloan is spoken in Aland. It is heavily influenced by Finnish.

Brittonic Celtic

  • Northern Brittonic (not a GI conlang)
    • Cemlic - 700s-today

-Cemlic is closely related to Cumbric & Welsh.

  • Northern Brittonic (not a GI conlang)
    • Welsh (not a GI conlang)
      • Jafavalifi - 1700s-today

-Jafavalifi is influenced by Italian, Arabic, & Jowan (a Japonic language).

  • Southern Brittonic (not a GI conlang)
    • Cordernese - 1300s-today

-Cordernese is closely related to Bretton & Cornish. It is heavily influenced by Norman.

  • Southern Brittonic (not a GI conlang)
    • Cornish (not a GI conlang)
      • Kronese - 1400s-today

-Kronese is heavily influenced by English & Dutch.

Celto-Hellenic

The Celto-Hellenic languages are languages that share features from both Celtic languages & Hellenic languages.

  • Proto-Indo-European (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Celto-Hellenic - 1000BC-600BC
      • Old Eikalakan - 500BC-600AD
        • Middle Eikalakan - 700s-1400s
          • Modern Eikalakan - 1500s-today

-Eikalakan is spoken in Western Anatolia. The language is heavily influenced by Greek, Galatian, Egyptian, & Hittite.

  • Proto-Iindo-European (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Celto-Hellenic - 1000BC-600BC
      • Old Eikalakan - 500BC-600AD
        • Early Karatan - 500s-1200s
          • Modern Karatan - 1300s-today

-Karatan is spoken in Northwestern Syria. It is influenced by Arabic. Modern varieties are influenced by French & Japanese.

  • Proto-Indo-European (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Celto-Hellenic - 1000BC-600AD
      • Early Dargeran - 700s-1600s
        • Modern Dargeran - 1700s-today

-Dargeran is spoken in Southwestern Romania. It is influenced by Dacian & Old Norse.

Scandanavian Celtic

The Scandanavian Celtic languages are spoken in Scandanavia. They are largely influenced by the North Germanic languages.

  • Proto-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Scandanavian Celtic - 700BC-300AD

-Proto-Scandanavian & later dialects where already heavily influenced by Old Norse.

  • Proto-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Scandanavian Celtic - 700BC-300AD
      • Eastern Dialects - 200BC-300AD
        • Old Arberese - 900s-1300s
          • Middle Arberese - 900s-1300s
            • Modern Arberese - 1400s-today
              • Moddern Arberese - 1400s-today

-Earlier forms of Arberese is influenced by Swedish. Later forms are influenced by German. Arberese is spoken in Germany.

  • Proto-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Scandanavian Celtic - 700BC-300AD
      • Eastern Dialects
        • Old Blanorian
          • Middle Blanorian - 1100s-1700s
            • Modern Blanorian - 1800s-today

-Old Blanorian is a mixture of Eastern & Southern dialects. Old Blanorian is influenced by Swedish, Danish, & Finnish. Middle Blanorian is influenced by French & Danish.

  • Proto-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Scandanavian Celtic - 700BC-300AD
      • Southern Dialects - 200BC-300AD
        • Early Beribese - 400s-900s
          • Middle Beribese - 1000s-1600s
            • Modern Beribese - 1700s-toda

-Beribese is influenced by Danish.

  • Proto-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Scandanavian Celtic - 700BC-300AD
      • Northwestern Dialects - 200BC-300AD
        • Early Brerdic - 400s-1100s
          • Middle Brerdic - 1200s-1700s
            • Modern Brerdic - 1800s-today

-Brerdic is heavily influenced by Norwegian. It is also influenced by Sami.

Other Celtic

These languages don't fit evenly to any particular subbranch of Celtic. They are descendent of Proto-Celtic.

  • Proto-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Proto-Morenese - 500BC-1400AD
      • Early Morenese - 1500s-1700s
        • Modern Morenese - 1800s-today

-Morenese is spoken in Scotland. Some people claim it to be related to Pictish. It is influenced by Scottish English as well as Gailic.

  • Proto-Celtic (not a GI conlang)
    • Early Esanese - 500s-800s
      • Middle Esanese -900s-1300s
        • Modern Esanese - 1400s-today

-Esanese is spoken in Gascony. It is heavily influenced by Basque & is more recently influenced by French.

The Finyan Language

The Finyan language was spoken by a Chinese like people in Finland. The language is not well attested, but it does bare some resemblance to the Celtic Languages. It is largely influenced by Finnish and by another language said to be related with Chinese. Some have even claimed that there is a Tungusic element as well. The language is known by only a few runic inscriptions dating from the 1200s to the 1500s.

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki